Cardiology

New discoveries in lupus research

Two separate findings by a University of Houston nationally recognized expert in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE or lupus), a chronic autoimmune disease that affects multiple organs including the kidneys, skin, joints and ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Advancing diagnostics for lupus nephritis

The nature of a typical clinical test for lupus nephritis (LN), an inflammation of the kidneys and a leading cause of mortality in lupus patients, is fraught with difficulty. The invasive renal biopsy can be painful and may ...

Medications

ACR updates guidelines for peri-TJA med use in rheumatic disease

In a guideline summary issued by the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons (AAHKS), updated recommendations are presented for the use of medications among patients with ...

Medications

Dose range for iberdomide studied in systemic lupus erythematosus

For patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), iberdomide at a higher dose is superior to placebo for the rate of response indicating reduction in disease activity, according to a study published in the March 17 issue ...

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Systemic lupus erythematosus

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE or lupus, pronounced sɪˈstɛmɪk ˈluːpəs ˌɛrəˌθiməˈtoʊsəs (help·info)) is a chronic autoimmune connective tissue disease that can affect any part of the body. As occurs in other autoimmune diseases, the immune system attacks the body’s cells and tissue, resulting in inflammation and tissue damage.

SLE most often harms the heart, joints, skin, lungs, blood vessels, liver, kidneys, and nervous system. The course of the disease is unpredictable, with periods of illness (called flares) alternating with remissions. The disease occurs nine times more often in women than in men, especially between the ages of 15 and 50, and is more common in those of non-European descent.

SLE is treatable through addressing its symptoms, mainly with corticosteroids and immunosuppressants; there is currently no cure. SLE can be fatal, although with recent medical advances, fatalities are becoming increasingly rare. Survival for people with SLE in the United States, Canada, and Europe is approximately 95% at five years, 90% at 10 years, and 78% at 20 years.

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