Obstetrics & gynaecology

Pregnancy outcomes greatly improved in lupus patients

Historically, pregnancy in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was considered so risky that physicians counseled women to avoid becoming pregnant and recommended that women carrying a child terminate their pregnancy. ...

Obstetrics & gynaecology

In-hospital maternal mortality down in pregnancies with lupus

(HealthDay)—In-hospital maternal mortality decreased from 1998 to 2015 in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and non-SLE pregnancies, with a greater decline for SLE pregnancies, according to a study published online July ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

B cells off the rails early in lupus

New research on the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) provides hints to the origins of the puzzling disorder. The results were published Monday in Nature Immunology.

Medical research

How a common viral infection can lead to autoimmunity

Researchers in Dr. Leona Gilbert's research group at the University of Jyväskylä have proposed a novel mechanism for how a common viral infection could lead to an autoimmune disease. Dr. Gilbert's team demonstrated for ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

CDC: Racial disparity seen with lupus-related deaths

(HealthDay)—Mortality from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is significantly higher among blacks, according to research published in the May 10 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and ...

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Systemic lupus erythematosus

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE or lupus, pronounced sɪˈstɛmɪk ˈluːpəs ˌɛrəˌθiməˈtoʊsəs (help·info)) is a chronic autoimmune connective tissue disease that can affect any part of the body. As occurs in other autoimmune diseases, the immune system attacks the body’s cells and tissue, resulting in inflammation and tissue damage.

SLE most often harms the heart, joints, skin, lungs, blood vessels, liver, kidneys, and nervous system. The course of the disease is unpredictable, with periods of illness (called flares) alternating with remissions. The disease occurs nine times more often in women than in men, especially between the ages of 15 and 50, and is more common in those of non-European descent.

SLE is treatable through addressing its symptoms, mainly with corticosteroids and immunosuppressants; there is currently no cure. SLE can be fatal, although with recent medical advances, fatalities are becoming increasingly rare. Survival for people with SLE in the United States, Canada, and Europe is approximately 95% at five years, 90% at 10 years, and 78% at 20 years.

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