Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

CDC: Racial disparity seen with lupus-related deaths

(HealthDay)—Mortality from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is significantly higher among blacks, according to research published in the May 10 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and ...

Immunology

Altered gut microbiome seen in patients with active lupus

(HealthDay)—The microbiome of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), particularly those with increased disease activity, has reduced taxonomic complexity, according to a study published online Feb. 19 in the ...

Immunology

Lupus strongly linked to imbalances in gut microbiome

The disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)—marked by the attack on joints, skin, and kidneys by the body's immune system—is linked to an abnormal mix of bacteria in the gut. This is according to a new study led by ...

Arthritis & Rheumatism

Researchers reveal how receptor TLR-9 protects against lupus

When the pathogen-sensing intracellular receptors TLR-7 and TLR-9 were implicated in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), it was suspected that their removal would lessen the severity of the disease. However, while this held ...

page 1 from 17

Systemic lupus erythematosus

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE or lupus, pronounced sɪˈstɛmɪk ˈluːpəs ˌɛrəˌθiməˈtoʊsəs (help·info)) is a chronic autoimmune connective tissue disease that can affect any part of the body. As occurs in other autoimmune diseases, the immune system attacks the body’s cells and tissue, resulting in inflammation and tissue damage.

SLE most often harms the heart, joints, skin, lungs, blood vessels, liver, kidneys, and nervous system. The course of the disease is unpredictable, with periods of illness (called flares) alternating with remissions. The disease occurs nine times more often in women than in men, especially between the ages of 15 and 50, and is more common in those of non-European descent.

SLE is treatable through addressing its symptoms, mainly with corticosteroids and immunosuppressants; there is currently no cure. SLE can be fatal, although with recent medical advances, fatalities are becoming increasingly rare. Survival for people with SLE in the United States, Canada, and Europe is approximately 95% at five years, 90% at 10 years, and 78% at 20 years.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA