Genetics

Race-specific lupus nephritis biomarkers

University of Houston Hugh Roy and Lillie Cranz Cullen Endowed Professor of biomedical engineering, Chandra Mohan, and his team have discovered a difference in urinary biomarker proteins of lupus nephritis (LN) in patients ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Breakthrough science provides hope for lupus patients

Today the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) publishes research led by Monash University Professor Eric Morand that offers the first real hope for the treatment of lupus, a disease which affects 1.5 million ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Hydroxychloroquine blood levels predict retinopathy risk in lupus

(HealthDay)—Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) blood levels are useful in predicting retinopathy among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), according to a study published online Sept. 18 in Arthritis & Rheumatology.

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Systemic lupus erythematosus

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE or lupus, pronounced sɪˈstɛmɪk ˈluːpəs ˌɛrəˌθiməˈtoʊsəs (help·info)) is a chronic autoimmune connective tissue disease that can affect any part of the body. As occurs in other autoimmune diseases, the immune system attacks the body’s cells and tissue, resulting in inflammation and tissue damage.

SLE most often harms the heart, joints, skin, lungs, blood vessels, liver, kidneys, and nervous system. The course of the disease is unpredictable, with periods of illness (called flares) alternating with remissions. The disease occurs nine times more often in women than in men, especially between the ages of 15 and 50, and is more common in those of non-European descent.

SLE is treatable through addressing its symptoms, mainly with corticosteroids and immunosuppressants; there is currently no cure. SLE can be fatal, although with recent medical advances, fatalities are becoming increasingly rare. Survival for people with SLE in the United States, Canada, and Europe is approximately 95% at five years, 90% at 10 years, and 78% at 20 years.

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