Immunology

Clues to lupus's autoimmune origins in precursor cells

In the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus or SLE, the immune system produces antibodies against parts of the body itself. How cells that produce those antibodies escape the normal "checks and balances" has been ...

Arthritis & Rheumatism

Clinical advances in systemic lupus erythematosus

The results of two studies presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2018) demonstrate exciting advances for individuals suffering from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The first is a phase ...

Immunology

Sirtuin-1 levels linked to lupus

The Cardiometabolic and Kidney Risk Research Group, in collaboration with the Genomic and Genetic Diagnosis Unit of the Health Research Institute of Valencia's Hospital Clínico, INCLIVA, the Department of Biochemistry and ...

Genetics

Epstein-Barr virus linked to seven serious diseases

A far-reaching study conducted by scientists at Cincinnati Children's reports that the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)—best known for causing mononucleosis—also increases the risks for some people of developing seven other major ...

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Systemic lupus erythematosus

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE or lupus, pronounced sɪˈstɛmɪk ˈluːpəs ˌɛrəˌθiməˈtoʊsəs (help·info)) is a chronic autoimmune connective tissue disease that can affect any part of the body. As occurs in other autoimmune diseases, the immune system attacks the body’s cells and tissue, resulting in inflammation and tissue damage.

SLE most often harms the heart, joints, skin, lungs, blood vessels, liver, kidneys, and nervous system. The course of the disease is unpredictable, with periods of illness (called flares) alternating with remissions. The disease occurs nine times more often in women than in men, especially between the ages of 15 and 50, and is more common in those of non-European descent.

SLE is treatable through addressing its symptoms, mainly with corticosteroids and immunosuppressants; there is currently no cure. SLE can be fatal, although with recent medical advances, fatalities are becoming increasingly rare. Survival for people with SLE in the United States, Canada, and Europe is approximately 95% at five years, 90% at 10 years, and 78% at 20 years.

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