Oncology & Cancer

USPSTF recommends risk-reducing meds for breast cancer

(HealthDay)—The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends risk-reducing medications for women at high risk for breast cancer who are at low risk for adverse events, but medications are not recommended for ...

Medical research

A molecule for fighting muscular paralysis

Myotubular myopathy is a severe genetic disease that leads to muscle paralysis from birth and results in death before two years of age. Although no treatment currently exists, researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE), ...

Oncology & Cancer

ASCO: ovarian suppression + tamoxifen ups breast CA survival

(HealthDay)—The addition of ovarian suppression to tamoxifen is associated with increased survival versus tamoxifen alone among premenopausal women with breast cancer, according to a study published online June 4 in the ...

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Tamoxifen

Tamoxifen is an antagonist of the estrogen receptor in breast tissue and is therefore used in the treatment of breast cancer. As of 2004, it was the world's largest selling drug for that purpose.

Some breast cancer cells require estrogen to grow. Estrogen binds to and activates the estrogen receptor in these cells. Tamoxifen is metabolized into compounds that also bind to the estrogen receptor but do not activate it. Furthermore tamoxifen prevents estrogen from binding to its receptor. Hence breast cancer cell growth is blocked.

Tamoxifen was discovered by ICI Pharmaceuticals (now AstraZeneca) and is sold under the trade names Nolvadex, Istubal, and Valodex. However, the drug, even before its patent expiration, was and still is widely referred to by its generic name "tamoxifen."

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