Oncology & Cancer

Diagnostic imaging may increase risk of testicular cancer

Early and repeated exposures to diagnostic imaging, such as X-rays and CT scans, may increase the risk of testicular cancer, suggests a new study from Penn Medicine researchers published online today in PLOS ONE.

Oncology & Cancer

Side effects from testicular cancer predicted by machine learning

In collaboration with Rigshospitalet, researchers from DTU Health Technology have developed a machine learning model that can predict chemotherapy-associated nephrotoxicity, a particularly significant side effect in patients ...

Oncology & Cancer

Healthy men: April is testicular cancer awareness month

Did you know that the most common form of cancer in boys and young men ages of 15-35 is almost entirely curable if caught early? And did you know that awareness and screening are the most effective ways to fight that disease? ...

Health

Poor semen quality in Switzerland

Over the last 50 years, a marked decrease in sperm count has been observed in the western world. But what about the situation in Switzerland? Up until now, no study had evaluated the reproductive health of Swiss young men. ...

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Testicular cancer

Testicular cancer is cancer that develops in the testicles, a part of the male reproductive system.

In the United States, between 7,500 and 8,000 diagnoses of testicular cancer are made each year. Over his lifetime, a man's risk of testicular cancer is roughly 1 in 250 (four tenths of one percent, or 0.4 percent). It is most common among males aged 15–40 years, particularly those in their mid-twenties. Testicular cancer has one of the highest cure rates of all cancers: in excess of 90 percent; essentially 100 percent if it has not metastasized. Even for the relatively few cases in which malignant cancer has spread widely, chemotherapy offers a cure rate of at least 85 percent today. Not all lumps on the testicles are tumors, and not all tumors are malignant; there are many other conditions such as testicular microlithiasis, epididymal cysts, appendix testis (hydatid of Morgagni), and so on which may be painful but are non-cancerous.

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