Pediatrics

Screen time plus snacking a risk for metabolic disorder in teens

Teens who sit for hours watching TV, using the computer or playing video games while eating unhealthy snacks are at increased risk for a group of risk factors for heart disease and diabetes, according to research to be presented ...

Cardiology

Want to fight heart disease? Stand up.

Too much sitting has long been criticized for contributing to premature mortality, Type 2 diabetes, and a host of other illnesses. In a new study of 5,638 women, we looked at how sedentary behavior was related to future cardiovascular ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Having a second child worsens parents' mental health

Children are a wonderful gift, bringing joy, laughter, and love. But, then there are the toys, the sleepless nights, the constant barrage of "why?" questions and the plethora of sticky handprints.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Computer game encourages people to be more risk-aware

How do you encourage people in the midst of an emergency to stay calm and prioritise their safety over their possessions? University of Bristol researchers have devised a game which they believe could help, by encouraging ...

Health

The benefits of moving more

(HealthDay)—In the battle of the bulge, it's not just getting exercise that matters—what you do when you're not formally working out counts, too.

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Mindkiller

Mindkiller is a 1982 novel by science fiction writer Spider Robinson. The novel, set in the late 1980s, explores the social implications of technologies to manipulate the brain, beginning with wireheading, the use of electrical current to stimulate the pleasure center of the brain in order to achieve a narcotic high.

A central character in the novel is a young woman who has attempted suicide by permanent wireheading, the constant use of which overrides desires for food and drink.

The novel incorporates as its second chapter a slightly modified version of his short story "God is an Iron" (first published in the May 1979 issue of Omni), a social commentary on the nature of addiction and addictive personalities built on wireheading.

The novel is unusual in its use of point of view, in a fashion similar to that of Robinson's mentor Robert A. Heinlein's novel The Number of the Beast.

An independent sequel, Time Pressure is set in 1974 and concerns the later discovery of a method of limited time travel by the protagonists of Mindkiller, though this connection may not be obvious to the casual reader until late in the novel. Baen Books has published these two novels, along with a third book in the series, Lifehouse, as an omnibus volume under the title The Lifehouse Trilogy.

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