Oncology & Cancer

Use the common cold virus to target and disrupt cancer cells?

A novel mechanism used by adenovirus to sidestep the cell's suicide program, could go a long way to explain how tumor suppressor genes are silenced in tumor cells and pave the way for a new type of targeted cancer therapy, ...

Oncology & Cancer

Team finds key to common cancer pathway

Scientists have long known that the protein p53, when mutated, is a critical factor in the onset of many different kinds of cancer. In its unmutated form, however, it is known to protect against cancer.

Genetics

Regulatory RNA essential to DNA damage response

Stanford researchers have found that a tumor suppressor known as p53 is stabilized by a regulatory RNA molecule called DINO. The interaction helps a cell respond to DNA damage and may play a role in cancer development and ...

Oncology & Cancer

Cancer cell metabolism kills

Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) is the main energy source for all forms of work inside our cells. Scientists from the University of Helsinki, Finland, have found that even a short-term shortage of ATP supply can be fatal ...

Oncology & Cancer

Cancer suppressor gene links metabolism with cellular aging

The tumor suppressor protein p53 is an attractive target for drug developers. But this path has so far proven difficult, as most p53 regulatory proteins operate via protein-protein interactions, which make for poor drug targets, ...

Oncology & Cancer

Cold viruses point the way to new cancer therapies

Cold viruses generally get a bad rap—which they've certainly earned—but new findings by a team of scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies suggest that these viruses might also be a valuable ally in the ...

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