Oncology & Cancer

Ultraviolet radiation causes rare type of eye cancer

Ultraviolet radiation can cause a rare type of eye cancer, conjunctival melanoma, according to research funded by Cancer Research UK and others and published in Nature Communications today.

Health

Everything you want to know about sunscreen

From safety and effectiveness to who should use sunscreen and how to apply it, Canadian dermatologists review the latest evidence and guidelines on use of sunscreen.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

US govt reveals details of sunlight study on virus

The US Department of Homeland Security revealed to AFP on Tuesday new technical details regarding its highly anticipated study into how ultraviolet radiation destroys the new coronavirus, saying that its experiment had accurately ...

Oncology & Cancer

Study finds 'hyperhotspots' that could predict skin cancer risk

New research by Yale University scientists reports the discovery of "hyperhotspots" in the human genome, locations that are up to 170-times more sensitive to ultraviolet radiation (UV) from sunlight compared to the genome ...

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Ultraviolet

Ultraviolet (UV) light is electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength shorter than that of visible light, but longer than x-rays, in the range 10 nm to 400 nm, and energies from 3 eV to 124 eV. It is so named because the spectrum consists of electromagnetic waves with frequencies higher than those that humans identify as the color violet.

UV light is found in sunlight and is emitted by electric arcs and specialized lights such as black lights. As an ionizing radiation it can cause chemical reactions, and causes many substances to glow or fluoresce. Most people are aware of the effects of UV through the painful condition of sunburn, but the UV spectrum has many other effects, both beneficial and damaging, on human health.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA