Oncology & Cancer

Skin cancer in people of color

Dark skin does provide some protection against the sun's ultraviolet rays, but it's a myth that people with dark skin tones are immune to the harmful effects of UV radiation.

Oncology & Cancer

Scientists uncover unique immune cell surveillance mechanism

Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute and King's College London have identified how specialist immune cells, called gamma delta T cells (γδ T cells), sense the body's status quo, enabling them to assess the health ...

Biomedical technology

Invisible virus protection for indoor spaces

Despite myriad precautionary measures, virus-contaminated aerosols still pose a serious problem indoors. An invisible protective wall of UV-C light developed by researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Will summer slow the spread of COVID-19? New research sheds light

At face value, it seems highly plausible that SARS-CoV-2—the virus that causes COVID-19—could behave seasonally, being more prevalent in winter and less so in summer. The four other coronaviruses that commonly circulate ...

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Ultraviolet

Ultraviolet (UV) light is electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength shorter than that of visible light, but longer than x-rays, in the range 10 nm to 400 nm, and energies from 3 eV to 124 eV. It is so named because the spectrum consists of electromagnetic waves with frequencies higher than those that humans identify as the color violet.

UV light is found in sunlight and is emitted by electric arcs and specialized lights such as black lights. As an ionizing radiation it can cause chemical reactions, and causes many substances to glow or fluoresce. Most people are aware of the effects of UV through the painful condition of sunburn, but the UV spectrum has many other effects, both beneficial and damaging, on human health.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA