HIV & AIDS

Creating viral targets can weaken HIV vaccination

Vaccination against HIV can backfire if the vaccine induces the wrong kind of immune response. Scientists at Emory University's Yerkes National Primate Research Center have evidence—gleaned from several nonhuman primate ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Successful study of Swedish vaccine candidate against diarrhea

University of Gothenburg researchers have reported the first successful results of an oral, inactivated vaccine candidate ETVAX against enterotoxigenic E. coli diarrhea in a placebo-controlled phase I/II study in infants ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Measles death toll in Samoa rises to 15: UNICEF

The death toll from a measles outbreak raging in the Pacific nation of Samoa has risen to 15, with most of the victims young children, UNICEF said Tuesday.

Oncology & Cancer

Common TB vaccine associated with lower lung cancer rates

(HealthDay)—Childhood vaccination with the bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine is associated with a reduced risk for lung cancer, according to a study published online Sept. 25 in JAMA Network Open.

Pediatrics

Studies confirm HPV shot is safe

(HealthDay)—The HPV vaccine gives parents a chance to prevent their children from developing some types of cancer, and two new studies reaffirm what past research has found—the vaccine is safe.

Medical research

Respiratory syncytial virus transmission in the Middle East

Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a primary cause of lower respiratory tract infections among young children worldwide, and leads to 60,000 deaths globally each year. A vaccine does not yet exist, although several ...

Vaccine

A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a particular disease. A vaccine typically contains a small amount of an agent that resembles a microorganism. The agent stimulates the body's immune system to recognize the agent as foreign, destroy it, and "remember" it, so that the immune system can more easily recognize and destroy any of these microorganisms that it later encounters.

Vaccines can be prophylactic (e.g. to prevent or ameliorate the effects of a future infection by any natural or "wild" pathogen), or therapeutic (e.g. vaccines against cancer are also being investigated; see cancer vaccine).

The term vaccine derives from Edward Jenner's 1796 use of the term cow pox (Latin variolæ vaccinæ, adapted from the Latin vaccīn-us, from vacca cow), which, when administered to humans, provided them protection against smallpox.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA