Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Breakthrough in Zika virus vaccine

Researchers from the University of Adelaide have made significant advances in developing a novel vaccine against Zika virus, which could potentially lead to global elimination of the disease.

HIV & AIDS

Rectal microbes influence effectiveness of HIV vaccine

Microbes living in the rectum could make a difference to the effectiveness of experimental HIV vaccines, according to researchers at the University of California, Davis. The work is published Dec. 11 in the journal mSphere.

Medical research

Safer viruses for vaccine research and diagnosis

A new technology to produce safer 'hybrid' viruses at high volumes for use in vaccines and diagnostics for mosquito-borne diseases has been developed at The University of Queensland.

Pediatrics

State legislators react to preventable disease outbreaks

(HealthDay)—Increases in vaccine-preventable disease (VPD) outbreaks are associated with an increase in proposed state legislation that would restrict vaccine exemptions, according to a research letter recently published ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

MMR vaccine-eligible children traveling abroad fail to get vaccinated

While most U.S. infant and preschool-aged international travelers are eligible for measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccination prior to departure, almost 60 percent of eligible young travelers were not vaccinated during pretravel ...

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Vaccine

A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a particular disease. A vaccine typically contains a small amount of an agent that resembles a microorganism. The agent stimulates the body's immune system to recognize the agent as foreign, destroy it, and "remember" it, so that the immune system can more easily recognize and destroy any of these microorganisms that it later encounters.

Vaccines can be prophylactic (e.g. to prevent or ameliorate the effects of a future infection by any natural or "wild" pathogen), or therapeutic (e.g. vaccines against cancer are also being investigated; see cancer vaccine).

The term vaccine derives from Edward Jenner's 1796 use of the term cow pox (Latin variolæ vaccinæ, adapted from the Latin vaccīn-us, from vacca cow), which, when administered to humans, provided them protection against smallpox.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA