Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Clues to building a better herpes vaccine

Efforts to develop an effective vaccine for genital herpes, a common sexually transmitted disease, have largely failed. In a new study published in Nature, Yale researchers explore why, and their findings could lead to a ...

HIV & AIDS

The three big studies pushing at the frontiers of HIV prevention

There are an estimated 5000 new HIV transmissions every day. Around 70% of the 37 million people living with HIV globally are in sub-Saharan Africa. Of the 1.8 million new HIV transmissions worldwide in 2017, 800 000 occurred ...

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Vaccine

A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a particular disease. A vaccine typically contains a small amount of an agent that resembles a microorganism. The agent stimulates the body's immune system to recognize the agent as foreign, destroy it, and "remember" it, so that the immune system can more easily recognize and destroy any of these microorganisms that it later encounters.

Vaccines can be prophylactic (e.g. to prevent or ameliorate the effects of a future infection by any natural or "wild" pathogen), or therapeutic (e.g. vaccines against cancer are also being investigated; see cancer vaccine).

The term vaccine derives from Edward Jenner's 1796 use of the term cow pox (Latin variolæ vaccinæ, adapted from the Latin vaccīn-us, from vacca cow), which, when administered to humans, provided them protection against smallpox.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA