Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Only 57 percent of Americans say they would get a COVID-19 vaccine

Despite widespread agreement among experts that having a prophylactic COVID-19 vaccine will be critical to the nation's ability to safely return to some form of normalcy, only 57% of Americans say they would get a COVID-19 ...

Oncology & Cancer

A breakthrough with a new cancer vaccine

Scientists are ready to trial a new cancer vaccine in humans following the successful outcome of their preclinical studies.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Q&A: Getting to a COVID-19 vaccine as fast and as safely as possible

The novel coronavirus is not expected to disappear anytime soon. With physical distancing, virus testing, contact tracing, and potentially new therapeutics, we may be able to keep it partially at bay. But many eyes are looking ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

New coronavirus cases and deaths spike across America

(HealthDay)—New U.S. coronavirus cases surged across 37 states on Sunday, with worsening hotspots in the South and West also fueling new daily records for COVID-19 deaths.

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Vaccine

A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a particular disease. A vaccine typically contains a small amount of an agent that resembles a microorganism. The agent stimulates the body's immune system to recognize the agent as foreign, destroy it, and "remember" it, so that the immune system can more easily recognize and destroy any of these microorganisms that it later encounters.

Vaccines can be prophylactic (e.g. to prevent or ameliorate the effects of a future infection by any natural or "wild" pathogen), or therapeutic (e.g. vaccines against cancer are also being investigated; see cancer vaccine).

The term vaccine derives from Edward Jenner's 1796 use of the term cow pox (Latin variolæ vaccinæ, adapted from the Latin vaccīn-us, from vacca cow), which, when administered to humans, provided them protection against smallpox.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA