Neuroscience

How our sense of touch is a lot like the way we hear

(Medical Xpress)—When you walk into a darkened room, your first instinct is to feel around for a light switch. You slide your hand along the wall, feeling the transition from the doorframe to the painted drywall, and then ...

Medical research

Rock-a-bye fly: Why vibrations lead to sleepiness

It is common practice to rock babies to sleep. Children and grownups also get drowsy during long car rides. There is something about gentle mechanical stimuli that makes humans of all ages sleepy. Sleep in fruit flies is ...

Neuroscience

Scientists discover a new connection between the eyes and touch

Tiny eye movements can be used as an index of humans' ability to anticipate relevant information in the environment independent of the information's sensory modality, a team of scientists has found. The work reveals a connection ...

Neuroscience

How our body 'listens' to vibrations

The sensation of a mobile phone vibrating is familiar. The perception of these vibrations derives from specialized receptors that transduce them into neural signals sent to the brain. But how does the brain encode their physical ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Phantom phone alerts linked to cell phone dependency

You've probably felt or heard it before: a buzz in your pocket or a ding from your purse. You think a message has come to your phone, but when you look, the screen is blank.

Neuroscience

Single tone alerts brain to complete sound pattern

The processing of sound in the brain is more advanced than previously thought. When we hear a tone, our brain temporarily strengthens that tone but also any tones separated from it by one or more octaves. A research team ...

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