Medical research

Can antivirulence drugs stop infections without causing resistance?

Antivirulence drugs disarm pathogens rather than kill them, and although they could be effective in theory, antivirulence drugs have never been tested in humans. A new study to be published in the online journal mBio on Tuesday, ...

Immunology

New weapon of the immune system discovered

Max Planck researchers have discovered a completely new way in which the immune system recognizes pathogens. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor has long been a focus of research for pharma-cologists and toxicologists, as it recognizes ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

MRSA skin infections up, linked to furunculosis

(HealthDay) -- The incidence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) in the United States is increasing and is associated with follicular infection, most commonly folliculitis followed ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

How African salmonella strains are evolving to become more dangerous

Salmonella infections are typically the culprit behind food poisoning outbreaks, but in sub-Saharan Africa, they often cause drug-resistant, deadly bloodstream infections and meningitis. A study in mice published February ...

Medical research

Genes linked with malaria's virulence shared by apes, humans

The malaria parasite molecules associated with severe disease and death—those that allow the parasite to escape recognition by the immune system—have been shown to share key gene segments with chimp and gorilla malaria ...

Medical research

Newly designed molecule blocks chlamydia bacteria

Researchers at Duke University Medical Center have discovered a way to block the damaging actions of Chlamydia, the bacteria responsible for the largest number of sexually transmitted infections in the United States.

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