Neuroscience

Deep sleep critical for visual learning

Remember those "Magic Eye" posters from the 1990s? You let your eyes relax, and out of the tessellating structures, a 3-D image of a dolphin or a yin yang or a shark would emerge.

Neuroscience

The human brain can 'see' what is around the corner

Neuroscientists at the University of Glasgow have shown how the human brain can predict what our eyes will see next, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).

Neuroscience

Bilingualism may save brain resources as you age

New research findings show that bilingual people are great at saving brain power, that is. To do a task, the brain recruits different networks, or the highways on which different types of information flow, depending on the ...

Medical research

How does an outfielder know where to run for a fly ball?

(PhysOrg.com) -- Faced with a fly ball soaring deep into center field during the 1954 World Series, New York Giants center fielder Willie Mays turned his back on the ball, ran straight to the center field fence and caught ...

Neuroscience

Scientists find explanation for blindsight

(PhysOrg.com) -- The rare phenomenon of blindsight has been known for a long time, but until now has never been understood. People with blindsight are effectively blind through damage to the primary visual cortex and yet ...

Medical research

Children and adults see the world differently

Unlike adults, children are able to keep information from their senses separate and may therefore perceive the visual world differently, according to research published today.

Medical research

JPEG for the mind: How the brain compresses visual information

Most of us are familiar with the idea of image compression in computers. File extensions like ".jpg" or ".png" signify that millions of pixel values have been compressed into a more efficient format, reducing file size by ...

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