Psychology & Psychiatry

How words get an emotional meaning

Many objects and people can convey an emotional meaning. A pair of wool socks, for example, has an emotional value if it was the last thing the grandmother knitted before her death. The same applies to words. The name of ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Children understand familiar voices better than those of strangers

Familiar voices can improve spoken language processing among school-age children, according to a study by NYU's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. However, the advantage of hearing a familiar ...

Neuroscience

'False memories'—the hidden side of our good memory

Justice blindly trusts human memory. Every year throughout the world hundreds of thousands of court cases are heard based solely on the testimony of somebody who swears that they are reproducing exactly an event that they ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Sex of speaker affects listener language processing

(Medical Xpress)—Whether we process language we hear without regard to anything about the speaker is a longstanding scientific debate. But it wasn't until University of Kansas scientists set up an experiment showing that ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Getting your message across

Far from processing every word we read or hear, our brains often do not even notice key words that can change the whole meaning of a sentence, according to new research from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC).

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