Medical economics

New nurses work overtime, long shifts, and sometimes a second job

New nurses are predominantly working 12-hour shifts and nearly half work overtime, trends that have remained relatively stable over the past decade, finds a new study by researchers at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing. ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Couples creating art or playing board games release 'love hormone'

When couples play board games together or take a painting class with each other, their bodies release oxytocin—sometimes dubbed the "hugging hormone." But men wielding paintbrushes released twice as much or more as the ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Five ways to develop children's talents

Some people think talent is born. The often-told story of Mozart playing piano at 3 and composing at 5 reinforces such beliefs.

HIV & AIDS

Fury at HIV data leak in conservative Singapore

Rico has lived with HIV for almost a decade, confiding in only a small number of people in socially conservative Singapore, fearful of the reaction. Last month, he got a phone call saying information about his condition had ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Morals versus money: How we make social decisions

Our actions are guided by moral values. However, monetary incentives can get in the way of our good intentions. Neuroeconomists at the University of Zurich have now investigated which area of the brain resolves conflicts ...

Radiology & Imaging

Radiologists can help identify victims of domestic violence

Radiologists may play a crucial role in identifying signs of intimate partner violence, a type of domestic violence, according to a study published in the journal Radiology. Radiologists can identify potential violence-related ...

Health

Mindfulness and sleep can reduce exhaustion in entrepreneurs

When entrepreneurs are feeling exhausted but can't afford the time for adequate sleep, they may be able to replenish their energy with mindfulness exercises such as meditation, new research from Oregon State University indicates.

Health

How to head off sneaky weight gain

(HealthDay)—Slow and sneaky weight gain usually happens over time—on average one pound a year—so it's not always obvious at first, especially if you don't regularly weigh yourself.

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