Lymphoma

Breast implants slightly increase risk of breast ALCL

(HealthDay)—Breast implants are associated with an increased risk of anaplastic large-cell lymphoma in the breast (breast-ALCL), though the absolute risk is small, according to a study published online Jan. 4 in JAMA Oncology.

Jan 05, 2018
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How the immune system curbs its own mistakes

When we encounter a pathogen, the immune system is usually able to respond quickly and forcefully to protect us from infection. Some of its preparedness is inherent in the process by which white blood cells called B cells ...

Jan 11, 2018
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A new molecule to inhibit lymphoma growth

The prestigious scientific journal Clinical Cancer Research has published a study conducted by the research group led by Dr. Francesco Bertoni of the Institute of Oncology Research (IOR, affiliated to USI Università della ...

Nov 28, 2017
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Scientists identify genetic drivers of common lymphoma

An international team of scientists has pinpointed the genetic drivers of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma—the most common type of blood cancer—and determined the genes' clinical significance. The study, published in the ...

Oct 31, 2017
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Lymphoma risk up with thiopurine, anti-TNF Tx in IBD

(HealthDay)—For patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the risk of lymphoma is increased with use of thiopurine monotherapy, anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) monotherapy, and combination therapy, according to a ...

Nov 08, 2017
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Lymphoma is a cancer of the lymphocytes, a type of cell that forms part of the immune system. Typically, lymphomas present as a solid tumor of lymphoid cells. Treatment might involve chemotherapy and in some cases radiotherapy and/or bone marrow transplantation, and can be curable depending on the histology, type, and stage of the disease. These malignant cells often originate in lymph nodes, presenting as an enlargement of the node (a tumor). It can also affect other organs in which case it is referred to as extranodal lymphoma. Extranodal sites include the skin, brain, bowels and bone. Lymphomas are closely related to lymphoid leukemias, which also originate in lymphocytes but typically involve only circulating blood and the bone marrow (where blood cells are generated in a process termed haematopoesis) and do not usually form static tumors. There are many types of lymphomas, and in turn, lymphomas are a part of the broad group of diseases called hematological neoplasms.

Thomas Hodgkin published the first description of lymphoma in 1832, specifically of the form named after him, Hodgkin's lymphoma. Since then, many other forms of lymphoma have been described, grouped under several proposed classifications. The 1982 Working formulation classification became very popular. It introduced the category non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), divided into 16 different diseases. However, because these different lymphomas have little in common with each other, the NHL label is of limited usefulness for doctors or patients and is slowly being abandoned. The latest classification by the WHO (2008) lists 70 different forms of lymphoma divided in four broad groups.

Although older classifications referred to histiocytic lymphomas, these are recognized in newer classifications as of B, T or NK cell lineage. True histiocytic malignancies are rare and are classified as sarcomas.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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