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Sleep apnea news

Sleep apnea

Research shows that older patients with untreated sleep apnea need greater medical care

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common and costly medical condition leading to a wide range of health risks such as cardiovascular disease, stroke, depression, diabetes and even premature death. Researchers at the University ...

Sleep apnea

Losing tongue fat improves sleep apnea

Losing weight is an effective treatment for Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA), but why exactly this is the case has remained unclear. Now, researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have ...

Health

Getting a good night's sleep complicated by menopause

The value of a good night's sleep can't be underestimated. Unfortunately, sleep complaints are common during the menopause transition. A new study from Canada compared sleep quality, sleep duration, and sleep disorders between ...

Sleep apnea

Longer PAP therapy for apnea reduces medical visits, costs

(HealthDay)—In patients with moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea, positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy reduces acute and inpatient care visits as well as health care costs, according to a study recently published ...

Sleep apnea

Sleep apnea treatment associated with lower health care costs

Treating patients with moderate or severe obstructive sleep apnea with positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy is associated with reduced acute care visits and health care expenditures, according to a recent study.

Sleep apnea

Researchers use NHANES to search for hypothyroid-sleep apnea link

Several past studies have sought to determine if a link exists between thyroid disorders like hypothyroidism, a decrease in thyroid hormone levels, and sleep apnea, a potentially dangerous condition in which a sleeping person's ...

Oncology & Cancer

More cancer cases among women with sleep apnea

Women with severe sleep apnea appear to be at an elevated risk of getting cancer, a study shows. No causal relationship is demonstrated, but the link between nocturnal hypoxia in women and higher cancer risk is still clear.