Health

Vape at your own risk, expert says

On the heels of media reports of dozens of injuries suffered by people who vape, the University of Virginia's Blue Ridge Poison Center issued a statement Wednesday cautioning that vaping is a suspected cause of lung injury.

Oncology & Cancer

Researchers convert pro-tumor macrophages into cancer killers

Epithelial cancers, such as cancers of the lung and pancreas, use the ανβ3 molecule to gain drug resistance to standard cancer therapies and to become highly metastatic. In a paper published in Cancer Research, University ...

Oncology & Cancer

Scientists 'get on the nerves' of cancer cells

Modulation of neuroreceptors can stop the growth of lung carcinoma (cancer) cells, according to a recent study conducted by a group of researchers from the Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences ...

Health

FDA proposes graphic warning labels on cigarettes

(HealthDay)—Smokers would have to get past some gruesome imagery to purchase a pack of cigarettes under a new rule proposed Thursday by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Why are people still dying from Legionnaires' disease?

In the nearly 50 years since epidemiologists first discovered Legionnaires' disease, we have learned how to test for it, treat it and prevent it. So why are people still dying from it and why are more and more people becoming ...

Surgery

Gender affirmation surgery primer for radiologists

An ahead-of-print article published in the December issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) provides a much needed overview of gender affirmation surgical therapies encountered in diagnostic imaging, defining ...

Genetics

Promising gene replacement therapy moves forward

Research led by Dr. Krystof Bankiewicz, who recently joined The Ohio State University College of Medicine, shows that gene replacement therapy for Niemann-Pick type A disease is safe for use in nonhuman primates and has therapeutic ...

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Lung cancer is a disease characterized by uncontrolled cell growth in tissues of the lung. If left untreated, this growth can spread beyond the lung in a process called metastasis into nearby tissue and, eventually, into other parts of the body. Most cancers that start in lung, known as primary lung cancers, are carcinomas that derive from epithelial cells. Worldwide, lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related death in men and women, and is responsible for 1.3 million deaths annually, as of 2004. The most common symptoms are shortness of breath, coughing (including coughing up blood), and weight loss.

The main types of lung cancer are small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), also called oat cell cancer, and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The most common cause of lung cancer is long-term exposure to tobacco smoke. Nonsmokers account for 15% of lung cancer cases, and these cases are often attributed to a combination of genetic factors, radon gas, asbestos, and air pollution including secondhand smoke.

Lung cancer may be seen on chest radiograph and computed tomography (CT scan). The diagnosis is confirmed with a biopsy. This is usually performed by bronchoscopy or CT-guided biopsy. Treatment and prognosis depend on the histological type of cancer, the stage (degree of spread), and the patient's general wellbeing, measured by performance status. Common treatments include surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. NSCLC is sometimes treated with surgery, whereas SCLC usually responds better to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. This is partly because SCLC often spreads quite early, and these treatments are generally better at getting to cancer cells that have spread to other parts of the body.

Survival depends on stage, overall health, and other factors, but overall 14% of people in the United States diagnosed with lung cancer survive five years after the diagnosis.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA