Oncology & Cancer

Using sponges to wipe out cancer

A sponge found in Manado Bay, Indonesia, makes a molecule called manzamine A, which stops the growth of cervical cancer cells, according to a recent publication in the Journal of Natural Products submitted by researchers ...

Medical research

Study overturns 'snapshot' model of cell cycle in use since 1974

Cells have a big decision: Should they replicate or sleep? Healthy cells can go either way. Cancer cells' replication switches are stuck in the 'on' position. Now a study by University of Colorado Cancer Center researchers ...

Oncology & Cancer

Melanoma is killing fewest Americans in decades

Advances in treatment have led to the largest yearly declines in deaths due to melanoma ever recorded for this skin cancer, results of a new study suggest.

Oncology & Cancer

Stopping cancer in its tracks

It vaguely resembles a wave under the microscope, the cell's edge crashing and tumbling as it advances across the slide. But despite appearances, how cells move is a precise and tightly controlled process, involving a dynamic ...

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Melanoma i/ˌmɛləˈnoʊmə/ (from Greek μέλας - melas, "dark") is a malignant tumor of melanocytes. Melanocytes are cells that produce the dark pigment, melanin, which is responsible for the color of skin. They predominantly occur in skin, but are also found in other parts of the body, including the bowel and the eye (see uveal melanoma). Melanoma can occur in any part of the body that contains melanocytes.

Melanoma is less common than other skin cancers. However, it is much more dangerous and causes the majority (75%) of deaths related to skin cancer. Worldwide, doctors diagnose about 160,000 new cases of melanoma yearly. The diagnosis is more frequent in women than in men and is particularly common among Caucasians living in sunny climates, with high rates of incidence in Australia, New Zealand, North America, Latin America, and northern Europe. According to a WHO report, about 48,000 melanoma related deaths occur worldwide per year.

The treatment includes surgical removal of the tumor, adjuvant treatment, chemo- and immunotherapy, or radiation therapy. The chance of a cure is greatest when the tumor is discovered while it is still small and thin, and can be entirely removed surgically.

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