Cancer

How to catch ovarian cancer earlier

Fewer than half of ovarian cancer patients survive until five years after diagnosis. According to the American Cancer Society, this is because only about one-fifth of ovarian cancer cases are detected early, when the chances ...

Cancer

Infertility is linked to small increased risk of cancer

A study of over 64,000 women of childbearing age in the USA has found that infertility is associated with a higher risk of developing cancer compared to a group of over three million women without fertility problems, although ...

Cancer

Targeting stem-like cells could prevent ovarian cancer recurrence

Ovarian cancer is not the most common form of cancer, but it's among the deadliest. That's because about 70 percent of cases recur. A new study by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh, UPMC Hillman Cancer Center, Magee-Womens ...

Cancer

Lymphadenectomy does not up survival in advanced ovarian cancer

(HealthDay)—For patients with advanced ovarian cancer who have undergone intra-abdominal macroscopically complete resection and have clinically negative lymph nodes, lymphadenectomy is not associated with longer overall ...

Cancer

Should you get tested for the 'Breast cancer genes'?

(HealthDay)—Women who have specific mutations in genes known as BRCA are at increased risk for breast and ovarian cancers. Now, an influential expert panel reaffirms that certain women should be screened for the genes.

Cancer

U.S. agencies probing Johnson & Johnson over asbestos in talc

(HealthDay)—Johnson & Johnson is being investigated by the U.S. Justice Department and the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission over possible asbestos contamination of the company's baby powder and other talc-based products.

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Ovarian cancer is a cancerous growth arising from the ovary. Symptoms are frequently very subtle early on and may include: bloating, pelvic pain, difficulty eating and frequent urination, and are easily confused with other illnesses.

Most (more than 90%) ovarian cancers are classified as "epithelial" and are believed to arise from the surface (epithelium) of the ovary. However, some evidence suggests that the fallopian tube could also be the source of some ovarian cancers. Since the ovaries and tubes are closely related to each other, it is thought that these fallopian cancer cells can mimic ovarian cancer. Other types may arise from the egg cells (germ cell tumor) or supporting cells. These cancers are grouped into the category of gynecologic cancer.

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