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Best of Last Year: The top MedicalXpress articles of 2019

It was another good year for medical innovation as a trio of researchers won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for work on how cells adapt to oxygen. Americans William Kaelin and Gregg Semenza, and Britain Peter Ratcliffe ...

Medical research

New assay assesses multiple cellular pathways at once

A novel technological approach developed by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine expands from two to six the number of molecular pathways that can be studied simultaneously in a cell sample with the dual luciferase assay, ...

Neuroscience

New methods could help researchers watch neurons compute

Since the 1950s at least, researchers have speculated that the brain is a kind of computer in which neurons make up complex circuits that perform untold numbers of calculations every second. Decades later, neuroscientists ...

Medical research

Tracking titin in real time

Using new high-resolution imaging techniques, MDC researchers and colleagues have tracked titin, the body's largest protein, in real time throughout its entire lifecycle. The method and results could provide new insight into ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Breakthrough in Zika virus vaccine

Researchers from the University of Adelaide have made significant advances in developing a novel vaccine against Zika virus, which could potentially lead to global elimination of the disease.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Deepening our understanding of selfish behavior

Is a selfish person just processing the decisions that result in rewards to others differently? Perhaps, suggests a recent RIKEN study. A RIKEN team, led by Hiroyuki Nakahara of the Laboratory for Integrated Theoretical Neuroscience ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Why your best idea may be your second favorite

Michelangelo reportedly said the job of every sculptor is to discover the statue inside the stone, then work around it. Liberate the form.

HIV & AIDS

Rectal microbes influence effectiveness of HIV vaccine

Microbes living in the rectum could make a difference to the effectiveness of experimental HIV vaccines, according to researchers at the University of California, Davis. The work is published Dec. 11 in the journal mSphere.