Oncology & Cancer

Inactive receptor renders cancer immunotherapies ineffective

The aim of immunotherapies is to enable the immune system to fight cancer on its own. Drugs known as checkpoint inhibitors are already in clinical use for this purpose. However, they are only effective in about one-third ...

Immunology

Creatine powers T cells' fight against cancer

Creatine, the organic acid that is popularly taken as a supplement by athletes and bodybuilders, serves as a molecular battery for immune cells by storing and distributing energy to power their fight against cancer, according ...

Oncology & Cancer

Drug-light combo could offer control over CAR T-cell therapy

Bioengineers at the University of California San Diego are a step closer to making CAR T-cell therapy safer, more precise and easy to control. They developed a system that allows them to select where and when CAR T cells ...

Health

Healthy Men: Men and belly fat: A bad combination

Call it what you will: beer belly, love handles, gut, spare tire, or anything else. Whatever the words, they're all referring to the same thing: belly fat, which is one of the most common types of fat for men. As you've no ...

Oncology & Cancer

Increased risk for skin cancer with increased solarium use

There are only few studies investigating the association between solarium use and risk of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in the skin. A new study from the Institute of Basic Medical Sciences at the University of ...

Oncology & Cancer

Skin cancer above the neck more likely to spread, research shows

New results from a descriptive, 6-month clinical study suggest that malignant melanoma (MM) that develops on the neck has a higher chance of spreading beyond the skin compared with MM that develops below the neck. However, ...

Oncology & Cancer

Decades-long drop in breast cancer death rate continues

A decades-long decline in the breast cancer death rate continues, but has begun to slow in recent years, while breast cancer incidence rates continue to inch up. These trends are outlined in Breast Cancer Statistics, 2019-2020, ...

Oncology & Cancer

One-two punch knocks cancer cells out

A classic boxing move, the "one-two punch," could also be effective against cancer: a left jab knocks cancer cells senseless, quickly followed by a right hook that knocks them out altogether. Researchers at the Netherlands ...

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Skin neoplasms (also known as "skin cancer") are skin growths with differing causes and varying degrees of malignancy. The three most common malignant skin cancers are basal cell cancer, squamous cell cancer, and melanoma, each of which is named after the type of skin cell from which it arises. Skin cancer generally develops in the epidermis (the outermost layer of skin), so a tumor can usually be seen. This means that it is often possible to detect skin cancers at an early stage. Unlike many other cancers, including those originating in the lung, pancreas, and stomach, only a small minority of those affected will actually die of the disease, though it can be disfiguring. Melanoma survival rates are poorer than for non-melanoma skin cancer, although when melanoma is diagnosed at an early stage, treatment is easier and more people survive.

Skin cancer is the most commonly diagnosed type of cancer. Melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers combined are more common than lung, breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer. Melanoma is less common than both basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, but it is the most serious — for example, in the UK there were over 11,700 new cases of melanoma in 2008, and over 2,000 deaths. It is the second most common cancer in young adults aged 15–34 in the UK. Most cases are caused by over-exposure to UV rays from the sun or sunbeds. Non-melanoma skin cancers are the most common skin cancers. The majority of these are basal cell carcinomas. These are usually localized growths caused by excessive cumulative exposure to the sun and do not tend to spread.

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