Skin Cancer

Precise 3-D imaging of skin cancer tumours

Scientists and clinicians from Singapore and Germany have successfully used multispectral optoacoustic tomography (MSOT) to achieve accurate, real-time 3-D imaging of non-melanoma skin cancer tumours. This imaging technique ...

Nov 15, 2017
popularity15 comments 0

How to do a skin cancer body check

(HealthDay)—Every year, about 5 million Americans are treated for skin cancer—an abnormal growth of skin cells that most often develops on areas exposed to the sun.

Nov 15, 2017
popularity2 comments 0

What you need to know about honey bee stings

A Victorian man died yesterday after being stung by several bees. While bee sting deaths are rare (bees claim around two Australian lives each year), bees cause more hospitalisations than any venomous creature.

Nov 16, 2017
popularity0 comments 0

Tanning beds and risky behavior linked—in men

Even though men use tanning beds at lower rates than women, men who tan tend to do it in riskier ways, according to a study by researchers at the University of Connecticut. The findings should help public health officials ...

Nov 02, 2017
popularity1 comments 0

7 skin care myths you thought were true

Itchy skin, bright rashes, dark blemishes, sun burns. Our skin changes all the time, but usually we don't give it much thought until we spot a pimple here or a bumpy rash there. But every day your skin has a long list of ...

Oct 31, 2017
popularity2 comments 0

Tracking a rare and dangerous breast cancer

When you think of breast cancer, you probably picture a telltale lump. Gayathri Devi, PhD, dispels that image with a few photos: a person's chest with what looks like a rash, then a thermographic version of the image showing ...

Oct 24, 2017
popularity2 comments 0

Skin neoplasms (also known as "skin cancer") are skin growths with differing causes and varying degrees of malignancy. The three most common malignant skin cancers are basal cell cancer, squamous cell cancer, and melanoma, each of which is named after the type of skin cell from which it arises. Skin cancer generally develops in the epidermis (the outermost layer of skin), so a tumor can usually be seen. This means that it is often possible to detect skin cancers at an early stage. Unlike many other cancers, including those originating in the lung, pancreas, and stomach, only a small minority of those affected will actually die of the disease, though it can be disfiguring. Melanoma survival rates are poorer than for non-melanoma skin cancer, although when melanoma is diagnosed at an early stage, treatment is easier and more people survive.

Skin cancer is the most commonly diagnosed type of cancer. Melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers combined are more common than lung, breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer. Melanoma is less common than both basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, but it is the most serious — for example, in the UK there were over 11,700 new cases of melanoma in 2008, and over 2,000 deaths. It is the second most common cancer in young adults aged 15–34 in the UK. Most cases are caused by over-exposure to UV rays from the sun or sunbeds. Non-melanoma skin cancers are the most common skin cancers. The majority of these are basal cell carcinomas. These are usually localized growths caused by excessive cumulative exposure to the sun and do not tend to spread.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

Latest Spotlight News

Shaming overweight kids only makes things worse

(HealthDay)—Overweight kids who are shamed or stigmatized are more likely to binge eat or isolate themselves than to make positive changes such as losing weight, a leading pediatricians' group says.