Cancer

Do you need to wear sunscreen while skiing or snowboarding?

Yes, you definitely do. While the cold winter months may not immediately bring to mind warmth and sunshine, ultraviolet (UV) rays still pose a risk and you need to apply sunscreen before heading outdoors, just like in the ...

Medical research

Skin diseases study uses crowdsourcing to gather data

In 1906, English statistician Francis Galton happened to visit a livestock fair where fairgoers were invited to guess the dressed weight of an ox scheduled for imminent slaughter. Some 800 attendees took part and afterwards ...

Health

Seven myths and truths about healthy skin

Skin is our largest organ and something we may take for granted when it's healthy. As an academic dermatologist I frequently hear misleading "facts" that seem to be stubbornly enduring. Here are some of the most commonly ...

Health

FDA aims to strengthen sunscreen rules

(HealthDay)—The U.S. Food and Drug Administration took steps Thursday to tighten regulation of over-the-counter sunscreen products.

Immunology

Lupus strongly linked to imbalances in gut microbiome

The disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)—marked by the attack on joints, skin, and kidneys by the body's immune system—is linked to an abnormal mix of bacteria in the gut. This is according to a new study led by ...

Medical research

CRISPR gene editing makes stem cells 'invisible' to immune system

UC San Francisco scientists have used the CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing system to create the first pluripotent stem cells that are functionally "invisible" to the immune system, a feat of biological engineering that, in laboratory ...

Cancer

Cancer comparison across species highlights new drug targets

Cancer genes in mucosal melanoma, a rare and poorly understood subtype of melanoma, have been compared in humans, dogs and horses for the first time by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators. ...

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Skin neoplasms (also known as "skin cancer") are skin growths with differing causes and varying degrees of malignancy. The three most common malignant skin cancers are basal cell cancer, squamous cell cancer, and melanoma, each of which is named after the type of skin cell from which it arises. Skin cancer generally develops in the epidermis (the outermost layer of skin), so a tumor can usually be seen. This means that it is often possible to detect skin cancers at an early stage. Unlike many other cancers, including those originating in the lung, pancreas, and stomach, only a small minority of those affected will actually die of the disease, though it can be disfiguring. Melanoma survival rates are poorer than for non-melanoma skin cancer, although when melanoma is diagnosed at an early stage, treatment is easier and more people survive.

Skin cancer is the most commonly diagnosed type of cancer. Melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers combined are more common than lung, breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer. Melanoma is less common than both basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, but it is the most serious — for example, in the UK there were over 11,700 new cases of melanoma in 2008, and over 2,000 deaths. It is the second most common cancer in young adults aged 15–34 in the UK. Most cases are caused by over-exposure to UV rays from the sun or sunbeds. Non-melanoma skin cancers are the most common skin cancers. The majority of these are basal cell carcinomas. These are usually localized growths caused by excessive cumulative exposure to the sun and do not tend to spread.

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