Psychology & Psychiatry

Psychedelics: How they act on the brain to relieve depression

Up to 30% of people with depression don't respond to treatment with antidepressants. This may be down to differences in biology between patients and the fact that it often takes a long time to respond to the drugs—with ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

New research maps how the brain changes during depression treatment

For the first time, researchers have shown what happens to the brain when a person receives a depression treatment known as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). The results were published today in the American ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Depression, anxiety hit minorities hardest during pandemic

Americans' rates of depression and anxiety spiked during the first year of the pandemic, but the increases were much more pronounced among Black, Hispanic and Asian people than among white people, new research shows.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Self-reported postpartum depressive symptoms up during pandemic

There was a national increase in postpartum depressive symptoms (PDS) that worsened over the course of a year following the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a study published in the July issue of the Journal of ...

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Depression is a state of low mood and aversion to activity that can affect a person's thoughts, behaviour, feelings and physical well-being. Depressed people may feel sad, anxious, empty, hopeless, helpless, worthless, guilty, irritable, or restless. They may lose interest in activities that once were pleasurable, experience loss of appetite or overeating, or problems concentrating, remembering details or making decisions; and may contemplate or attempt suicide. Insomnia, excessive sleeping, fatigue, loss of energy, or aches, pains or digestive problems that are resistant to treatment may be present.

Depressed mood is a normal reaction to certain life events, a symptom of some medical conditions (e.g., Addison's disease, hypothyroidism), various medical treatments (e.g., hepatitis C drug therapy), and a feature of certain psychiatric syndromes.

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