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Disrupted sleep increases the risk of cardiovascular disease by promoting inflammation

Sleep disruption has been shown to be associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis, but the mechanism has been unclear. A new study in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Raphael Vallat, Vyoma Shah, and Matthew ...

Health

Model projects sharp rise in alcohol-related liver disease

Alcohol-related liver disease is currently the most common reason for liver transplantation in the United States. In recent years, high-risk drinking of alcohol—defined as exceeding daily drinking limits (more than four ...

Health

No smoke, but still hazardous

A technique that can better assess harmful chemicals adds to the analysis toolkit for cigarette alternatives.

Health

Newly discovered hormone could adjust thirst levels

A newly discovered hormone called phoenixin could play a major role in adjusting a person's level of thirst to the body's needs. The discovery of the hormone, which is made in the human body, bolsters scientific data showing ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Artificial nose shows potential to treat breathing disorders

A respiratory simulation device, complete with an artificial nose made from a 3-D printer, is the subject of Miami University's newest patent and a potential breakthrough in researching, diagnosing and treating breathing ...

Health

How can you sleep during a solo sailing race?

You are alone on a small sailing boat with more than four thousand miles of ocean ahead and you are up against approximately 80 sailors. It will take you three or four weeks to get to the finishing line. But how will you ...

Health

France to transform surplus wine into hand sanitiser

French winemakers will transform wine that went unsold during the country's two-month coronavirus lockdown into hand sanitiser and ethanol to make room for the next harvest, a farming agency said on Thursday.

Health

Your doctor's ready: Please log in to the videoconference

The coronavirus has prompted many medical centers to switch from in-person appointments to video visits. A new study from UCSF Benioff Children's Hospitals suggests that for some hospitals, video visits may become a permanent ...