Ovarian Cancer

No link found for metformin or statins and ovarian cancer

(HealthDay)—In women with type 2 diabetes, no evidence was found of an association between the use of metformin or statins and the incidence of ovarian cancer, according to a study published online Feb. 7 in BJOG: An International ...

Feb 27, 2018
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USPSTF recommends against ovarian cancer screening

(HealthDay)—The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends against screening for ovarian cancer in asymptomatic women. These findings form the basis of a final recommendation statement published in the Feb. ...

Feb 13, 2018
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Ovarian cancer is a cancerous growth arising from the ovary. Symptoms are frequently very subtle early on and may include: bloating, pelvic pain, difficulty eating and frequent urination, and are easily confused with other illnesses.

Most (more than 90%) ovarian cancers are classified as "epithelial" and are believed to arise from the surface (epithelium) of the ovary. However, some evidence suggests that the fallopian tube could also be the source of some ovarian cancers. Since the ovaries and tubes are closely related to each other, it is thought that these fallopian cancer cells can mimic ovarian cancer. Other types may arise from the egg cells (germ cell tumor) or supporting cells. These cancers are grouped into the category of gynecologic cancer.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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