Academic Emergency Medicine

Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) is the official monthly publication of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) and publishes information relevant to the practice, educational advancements, and investigation of emergency medicine. It is the second largest peer-reviewed scientific journal in the specialty of emergency medicine. The goal of AEM is to advance the science, education, and clinical practice of emergency medicine, to serve as a voice for the academic emergency medicine community, and to enhance the goals and objectives of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM). Members and non-members worldwide depend on this journal for translational medicine relevant to emergency medicine, in addition to clinical news, case studies and more.

Publisher
Wiley
Website
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1553-2712
Impact factor
1.861 (2011)

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Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Front-line physicians stressed and anxious at work and home

Amid the COVID-19 chaos in many hospitals, emergency medicine physicians in seven cities around the country experienced rising levels of anxiety and emotional exhaustion, regardless of the intensity of the local surge, according ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Nationwide EMS calls have dropped 26% since the start of the pandemic

Since early March and the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in the U.S., 911 calls for emergency medical services have dropped by 26.1 % compared to the past two years, a new study led by a University at Buffalo researcher has ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Early awake proning for COVID-19 improves oxygen saturation

(HealthDay)—In COVID-19 patients, awake early self-proning in the emergency department yields improved oxygen saturation, according to a study published online April 22 in Academic Emergency Medicine.

Health

Therapy dogs may help lower emergency clinicians' stress

New research published in Academic Emergency Medicine indicates that for physicians and nurses working evening shifts in the emergency department, interacting with a therapy dog for several minutes may help lower stress.

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