Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Why the origins of zoonotic diseases are difficult to track

About two years into the pandemic, we're still trying to find where and how it all started. Only last week, we heard bats in Laos may hold a clue about the origin of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID.

Neuroscience

How the brain filters out sounds

Bats are renowned for their echolocation skills, navigation using sound therefore: they 'see' with their extremely sensitive hearing, by emitting ultrasonic calls and forming a picture of their immediate environment on the ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Nipah virus: Could it cause the next pandemic?

The severe and devastating consequences of the coronavirus pandemic were undoubtedly made worse by a substantial lack of pandemic preparedness, with the exception of East and South East Asia, which had built up defenses after ...

Health

Mayo Clinic Minute: Bats can be a rabies threat

October is Bat Month and a good time to make sure they are not roosting in your home. The Humane Society of the United States has tips to evict them so they don't hibernate in your home for the winter.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Why some people are less naturally resistant to COVID-19

A large team of researchers affiliated with a host of institutions in the U.K. and Brazil has partially solved the mystery of why some people are less naturally resistant to COVID-19 than others. In their paper published ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Bats with COVID-like viruses found in Laos: study

Scientists have discovered another clue to the origins of the virus that causes COVID-19, with bats living in caves in Laos found to be carrying a similar pathogen that experts suggest could potentially infect humans directly.

page 1 from 12

Bat

See article

Bats are mammals in the order Chiroptera (pronounced /kaɪˈrɒptərə/). The forelimbs of bats are developed as wings, making them the only mammals naturally capable of flight (opposed to other mammals, such as flying squirrels, gliding possums and colugos, that glide only for a distance). Bats do not flap arms like birds, instead they flap spread out hands where their fingers are very long and covered with a thin membrane or patagium. Chiroptera comes from two Greek words cheir (χειρ) "hand" and pteron (πτερον) "wing."

There is an estimated total of about 1,100 species worldwide, which is about 20 percent of all classified mammal species. About 70 percent of bats are insectivores. Most of the rest are frugivores, with a few species being carnivorous. Bats are present throughout most of the world and perform a vital ecological role by pollinating flowers, and eat various plants to dispere their seeds. Many tropical plants depend for their seeds to be distributed entirely by bats.

Bats range in size from Kitti's Hog-nosed Bat measuring 29–33 mm (1.14–1.30 in) in length and 2 g (0.07 oz) in mass, to the Giant golden-crowned flying fox which has a wing span of 1.5 m (4 ft 11 in) and weighs approximately 1.2 kg (3 lb).

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA