Psychology & Psychiatry

Cannabis increases the noise in your brain

Several studies have demonstrated that the primary active constituent of cannabis, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (∆9-THC), induces transient psychosis-like effects in healthy subjects similar to those observed in schizophrenia. ...

Neuroscience

'Noisy' memory in schizophrenia

The inability to ignore irrelevant stimuli underlies the impaired working memory and cognition often experienced by individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia, reports a new study in the current issue of Biological Psychiatry.

Health

Scientists reveal drinking champagne could improve memory

(Medical Xpress)—New research shows that drinking one to three glasses of champagne a week may counteract the memory loss associated with ageing, and could help delay the onset of degenerative brain disorders, such as dementia.

Medical research

Fatty foods really are mood enhancers

A new study published in the August issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation shows just why it is that people tend to turn to fatty foods in order to boost their emotional state and reduce feelings of sadness. Be it ...

Disrupted biological clock linked to Alzheimer's disease

New research has identified some of the processes by which molecules associated with neurological diseases can disrupt the biological clock, interfere with sleep and activity patterns, and set the stage for a spiral of health ...

Neuroscience

Brain activity intensity drives need for sleep

The intensity of brain activity during the day, notwithstanding how long we've been awake, appears to increase our need for sleep, according to a new UCL study in zebrafish.

Medications

Estuarine waters hold promise in global pain-relief hunt

The worldwide search for an opioid alternative has made a leap forward—with a scientific discovery in an Australian fungus indicating effective pain relief and the potential for a safer less addictive drug, helping address ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

'Other-race effect': Clues to why 'they' all look alike

Northwestern University researchers have provided new biological evidence suggesting that the brain works differently when memorizing the face of a person from one's own race than when memorizing a face from another race.

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