Genetics

Why does divorce run in families? The answer may be genetics

Children of divorced parents are more likely to get divorced when compared to those who grew up in two-parent families—and genetic factors are the primary explanation, according to a new study by researchers at Virginia ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

First-time divorce rate tied to education, race

New research from the National Center for Family and Marriage Research (NCFMR) at Bowling Green State University shows there is substantial variation in the first-time divorce rate when it is broken down by race and education. ...

Neuroscience

Emotional adjustment following traumatic brain injury

Life after a traumatic brain injury resulting from a car accident, a bad fall or a neurodegenerative disease changes a person forever. But the injury doesn't solely affect the survivor – the lives of their spouse or partner ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Divorce hurts health more at earlier ages

Divorce at a younger age hurts people's health more than divorce later in life, according to a new study by a Michigan State University sociologist.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Parents' divorce increases risk of health disorders in children

Children's well-being is among the biggest concerns when a couple gets a divorce. Scientists at the universities of Santiago de Compostela and Vigo have carried out a study into how divorce affects children's health, finding ...

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Divorce

Divorce (or the dissolution of marriage) is the final termination of a marital union, canceling the legal duties and responsibilities of marriage and dissolving the bonds of matrimony between the parties (unlike annulment which declares the marriage null and void). Divorce laws vary considerably around the world but in most countries it requires the sanction of a court or other authority in a legal process. The legal process for divorce may also involve issues of spousal support, child custody, child support, distribution of property and division of debt. Where monogamy is law, divorce allows each former partner to marry another; where polygyny is legal but polyandry is not, divorce allows the woman to marry another.

Between 1971 and 2011, five European countries legalised divorce: Italy, Spain, Portugal, Ireland and Malta. This leaves two countries in the world—the Philippines and Vatican City—that do not have a civil procedure for divorce.

"Divorcing one's parents" is a term sometimes used to refer to emancipation of minors.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA