Cardiovascular risk counseling improves statin adherence

Cardiovascular risk counseling improves statin adherence
For patients taking statins for prevention of cardiovascular disease, extended care with nurse-led cardiovascular risk-factor counseling improves statin adherence and reduces anxiety, with improvements seen in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol for primary prevention patients, according to a study published online May 24 in The American Journal of Cardiology.

(HealthDay) -- For patients taking statins for prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD), extended care with nurse-led cardiovascular risk-factor counseling improves statin adherence and reduces anxiety, with improvements seen in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol for primary prevention patients, according to a study published online May 24 in The American Journal of Cardiology.

Pythia T. Nieuwkerk, Ph.D., of the University of Amsterdam, and colleagues conducted a study involving 201 patients with indications for statin therapy for primary or of CVD. Participants were randomized to receive routine care or extended care at baseline and at three, nine, and 18 months. Extended care consisted of providing patients with cardiovascular risk-factor counseling regarding modifiable and unmodifiable individual risk factors, graphical presentation of their calculated 10-year absolute CVD risk, and targets to reduce risk and improve adherence. and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) were measured.

Compared with routine care, the researchers found that extended care correlated with significantly lower anxiety and higher statin adherence (P < 0.01 for both). For primary prevention patients, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol was significantly lower, at 2.66 mmol/L, with extended care, compared with 3.00 mmol/L with routine care (P = 0.024). Both groups experienced significantly improved carotid IMT compared with baseline.

"In conclusion, cardiovascular risk-factor counseling resulted in improved in primary prevention patients and higher levels of adherence to statins and lower levels of anxiety in all patients," the authors write.

The study was partially funded by Pfizer.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Barriers preventing post-stroke care

8 hours ago

For stroke victims, rehabilitation is crucial to their recovery. But a Flinders University study conducted in Singapore found that rehabilitation rates following discharge from hospital are poor because of gaps in the continuum ...

Home-based rehabilitation for CVD patients

9 hours ago

Patients who are found to suffer from cardiovascular diseases often have long years of treatment ahead of them and are urged to drastically change their lifestyle. But what is probably the most difficult ...

New remote patient monitoring devices available

12 hours ago

(HealthDay)—Several new remote patient monitoring devices with useful applications are available or under development, according to an article published July 8 in Medical Economics.

Monitoring pulse after stroke may prevent a second stroke

23 hours ago

New research suggests that regularly monitoring your pulse after a stroke or the pulse of a loved one who has experienced a stroke may be a simple and effective first step in detecting irregular heartbeat, a major cause of ...

User comments