Dane cleared of crimes, said to have 'sexsomnia'

April 10, 2013

(AP)—A Danish man has been acquitted of molesting two 17-year-old girls after he was found to suffer from a rare sleep disorder known as "sexsomnia."

The Glostrup court said Wednesday that the man fondled the teenagers while sleeping in his suburban Copenhagen apartment after a party in 2011.

The girls awoke and interrupted the man, and later reported him to police.

But the court cleared the 31-year-old of charges, saying show he suffers from "sexsomnia" in which a person engages in sexual activity while asleep.

Michael Laub, a Danish sleep specialist who wasn't involved in the case, said it's a rare but widely recognized sleep disorder.

The defendant said he had no recollection of what happened.

Prosecutor Martin von Buelow said he wouldn't appeal the ruling.

Explore further: Survey finds many Americans nodding off away from bed


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