Biomarkers found for postmenopausal cardiovascular disease

July 27, 2010, BioMed Central

Analysis of blood protein data from the Women's Health Initiative cohorts has revealed new biomarkers for stroke and coronary heart disease (CHD). Research published in BioMed Central's open access journal Genome Medicine found that beta-2 microglobulin (B2M) levels were significantly elevated in postmenopausal women with CHD, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 4 (IGFBP4) was strongly associated with stroke.

Ross Prentice, from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Centre, Seattle, USA, worked with a team of researchers to carry out proteomic analyses on samples from 800 women who developed CHD, 800 who developed and a group of matched controls. He said, "We contrasted pools formed by equal plasma volumes from 100 cases or from 100 pair-matched controls, with eight such pool pairs for each of the study diseases. The two novel markers we identified, B2M and IGFBP4, have the potential to help elucidate hormone therapy effects on the cardiovascular diseases as observed in the WHI randomized controlled trials".

B2M has previously been associated with CHD risk factors including age, blood pressure, and C-reactive , and has been reported to show an inverse association with high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. According to Prentice, "Our finding of B2M elevation in plasma obtained months or years prior to CHD diagnosis appears to be novel, however". The identification of IGFBP4 as a risk marker for stroke in postmenopausal women also appears to be a novel finding.

Speaking about the results, Prentice said, " concentrations provide a source for novel disease risk markers that may be modifiable by treatments or other exposures. As such, protein markers have potential to enhance the understanding of , and to elucidate biological processes whereby an exposure affects disease risk."

More information: Novel proteins associated with risk for coronary heart disease or stroke among postmenopausal women identified by in-depth plasma proteome profiling, Ross L Prentice, Sophie J Paczesny, Aaron Aragaki, Lynn M Amon, Lin Chen, Sharon J Pitteri, Martin McIntosh, Pei Wang, Tina Busald Buson, Judith Hsia, Rebecca D Jackson, Jacques E Rossouw, JoAnn E Manson, Karen Johnson, Charles Eaton and Samir M Hanash, Genome Medicine (in press), genomemedicine.com/

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Discovery of the 'pioneer' that opens the genome

January 23, 2018
Our genome contains all the information necessary to form a complete human being. This information, encoded in the genome's DNA, stretches over one to two metres long but still manages to squeeze into a cell about 100 times ...

Researchers identify gene responsible for mesenchymal stem cells' stem-ness'

January 22, 2018
Many doctors, researchers and patients are eager to take advantage of the promise of stem cell therapies to heal damaged tissues and replace dysfunctional cells. Hundreds of ongoing clinical trials are currently delivering ...

Genes contribute to biological motion perception and its covariation with autistic traits

January 22, 2018
Humans can readily perceive and recognize the movements of a living creature, based solely on a few point-lights tracking the motion of the major joints. Such exquisite sensitivity to biological motion (BM) signals is essential ...

Peers' genes may help friends stay in school, new study finds

January 18, 2018
While there's scientific evidence to suggest that your genes have something to do with how far you'll go in school, new research by a team from Stanford and elsewhere says the DNA of your classmates also plays a role.

Two new breast cancer genes emerge from Lynch syndrome gene study

January 18, 2018
Researchers at Columbia University Irving Medical Center and NewYork-Presbyterian have identified two new breast cancer genes. Having one of the genes—MSH6 and PMS2—approximately doubles a woman's risk of developing breast ...

A centuries-old math equation used to solve a modern-day genetics challenge

January 18, 2018
Researchers developed a new mathematical tool to validate and improve methods used by medical professionals to interpret results from clinical genetic tests. The work was published this month in Genetics in Medicine.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.