Obesity rates keep rising for U.S. adults

March 23, 2018 by Dennis Thompson, Healthday Reporter

Obesity rates have continued to climb significantly among American adults, but the same hasn't held true for children, a new government report finds.

Obesity among increased to about 40 percent in 2015-2016, up from 34 percent in 2007-2008, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention researchers. That means two of every five adults now struggle with obesity.

Meanwhile, about 18.5 percent of kids were obese in 2015-2016, compared with 17 percent in 2007-2008.

"It's a different story for adults than it is for youth," said report author Dr. Craig Hales, a medical epidemiologist with the CDC. "In adults, unfortunately, we see a continuing increasing trend. But in youth, we see over the last 10 years, there has been this flattening out of the obesity and severe obesity prevalence rate."

One weight expert agreed the latest batch of data is mixed.

"There's no doubt about it, overall obesity remains an epidemic in the U.S. The numbers are tremendous," said Dr. Robert Courgi, an endocrinologist with Northwell Health's Southside Hospital in Bay Shore, N.Y. "But I thought I saw a silver lining, that it plateaued in . Maybe all these community efforts that we've put forth are making a difference."

Obesity is defined as a (BMI) of 30 or more. BMI is a measurement based on weight and height. The study also found that severe obesity—a BMI of 40 or more—had increased during the past decade.

Severe obesity increased from about 6 percent to about 8 percent among adults, but remained at around 5 percent for children, the investigators found.

Hales said the study shows more effort is needed to combat America's , even among children.

"Ideally, we'd like to see a decreasing trend, but that's not what we're seeing here," Hales explained.

Courgi noted that these results do show that obesity can be addressed, given that it doesn't appear to have been passed on to children.

Efforts such as providing healthier food in schools, promoting physical activity among children, and teaching kids about proper diet and exercise appear to be helping stem obesity in younger Americans, Courgi suggested.

The next step will be to extend that approach to adults on a medical basis, by treating it as a diagnosable disease, he said.

"We still need to change the culture's views on obesity," Courgi added. "Obesity is a disease. If you had an infection, you would take antibiotics. It needs to be recognized as a diagnosis with a solid treatment plan."

Dr. Reshmi Srinath, director of the Weight and Metabolism Management Program at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City, agreed.

"We need to take a multidisciplinary approach to and really focus on increasing awareness of obesity and its associated complications, and start screening for and complications at a young age," Srinath said.

The findings were published online March 23 as a research letter in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Explore further: US obesity problem is not budging, new data shows

More information: Craig M. Hales et al. Trends in Obesity and Severe Obesity Prevalence in US Youth and Adults by Sex and Age, 2007-2008 to 2015-2016, JAMA (2018). DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.3060

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32 comments

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Shootist
3.5 / 5 (2) Mar 23, 2018
virtual reality sexbots with treadmills, I tell you what.
MR166
5 / 5 (1) Mar 23, 2018
For 50 years the US government has been lying to people and telling them that fats cause one to gain weight. The truth is that high glycemic index carbs like sugar, breads, pastas, potatoes and rice cause hunger cravings and high blood sugar levels.

When the government decides that it does not want to kill any more people and starts to tell them the truth we will make gains on the obesity epidemic.
Bart_A
3 / 5 (2) Mar 23, 2018
MR166, I would take it one step further. All caloric intake has an effect on obesity. We don't need treadmills, we don't need exercise regimes, etc. We don't need "healthier foods". We don't need more information about "proper diet" or "how to exercise".

The answer is very simple, but alse very hard to implement.

We just need to limit caloric intake.
It requires lots of self-discipline in this age when food is almost free. But it works. And it works better than any other solution out there.
MR166
not rated yet Mar 23, 2018
Bart most diets do not work because they include high glycemic index carbs. Since these lead to huge blood sugar swings they are highly addictive just like drugs. When your blood sugar drops to normal your brain says EAT ! Don't eat the carbs and levels remain steady. You still get hungry but you never feel like you have to eat. You burn your own fat when you need energy.
TheGhostofOtto1923
1 / 5 (2) Mar 24, 2018
We just need to limit caloric intake
Barts opinion is based on the myth that humans sprang onto this earth as farmers and shepherds. And who taught Cain and Abel how to farm and herd Bart? Where did all those domesticated plants and animals come from Bart?

In reality we evolved as hunter gatherers. Our physiology developed in the context of constant movement, of chasing after food and being chased as food.

People were usually dead by their mid-twenties from accident, violence, predation, or in the case of women, childbirth.

Insufficient movement, exercise, and caloric intake makes the body think it's sick. It begins to store fat and consume muscle in response. The immune system kicks in, and when it cant find the source of this sickness it begins to attack the body itself, leading to chronic inflammation and autoimmune problems.

No, limiting food intake while sedentary is no solution. Metabolic syndrome is a disease state. Paleo exercise and diet is the solution.
TheGhostofOtto1923
1 / 5 (2) Mar 24, 2018
BTW domesticated means 'human-designed'. Our foods have been constantly selected over the course of 1000s of years for quantity over quality, in the attempt to mitigate the results of our tropical repro rate as we systematically eliminated those natural attritive elements that had served to keep our numbers in check.

The foods we eat today are not the ones we evolved to eat. Domestication is a recent phenomenon and our bodies have not had sufficient time to adapt, if that is indeed even possible. We absolutely require certain nutrients that are not available from domesticated foods.

The answer is not consuming less food that our physiologies are not designed to use, but eating undomesticated foods rich in nutrients and fiber, in the context of rigorous exercise.

Grass is the last thing a self-respecting hunter gatherer would eat. Grains, fermented foods, and dairy are the result of chronic overpopulation.
tekram
5 / 5 (2) Mar 24, 2018
There is really nothing new under the sun when it comes to human behavior. Most people are not capable of moderation in what they do and eat - by example you can just look at the behavior of the man currently so called 'in charge' of the fate of the free world.

Sir Robert Hutchinson, in Newcastle Medical Journal 1932, Vol 12
"One swears by whole meal bread, one by sour milk; vegetarianism is the only road to salvation of some, others insist not only on vegetables alone, but on eating those raw. At one time the only thing that matters is calories; at another time they are crazy about vitamins and roughage. The scientific truth may be put quite briefly; eat moderately, have an ordinary mixed diet and don't worry."
aksdad
not rated yet Mar 24, 2018
Grains, fermented foods, and dairy are the result of chronic overpopulation.

Pretty much every pastoral culture that keeps cattle or goats drinks milk, including nomads, from Africa to Mongolia. They've been doing it for thousands of years. Hardly overpopulating their environment.

Domesticating animals and growing crops was the first giant leap toward providing sufficient nutrition reliably. How about trying a hunterer-gatherer lifestyle yourself for a few months and get back to us? Remember to hunt and gather in the wild, not at your local grocery.

In case you forgot basic biology, humans are omnivores and have "evolved" to eat pretty much anything. Grains and milk are just fine. So is meat and fat. And fruits and vegetables. And "fermented foods". Sugar and excessive carbohydrate consumption, however, are the royal road to obesity.

And "chronic overpopulation", really?
Jay1212
1 / 5 (1) Mar 24, 2018
It's due to our get bacteria getting f'ed up by all the preservatives, flame retardants, and crap like BPA on paper receipts that you just cannot avoid. It's not calories. One day soon they'll figure out a fix to tweak the microbiome to burn calories but stop blaming people or assuming they eat too much. There is tons of sht in the water (pharm meds, plastics, that cannot be removed) and air pollution that contribute too. Yourself in 1986 would gain much less weight eating/exercisong the same amount as a 2018 version of yourself the same age. This is a problem w what is happening in the gut due to chemicals that cannot be reeled back in.....
TheGhostofOtto1923
1 / 5 (1) Mar 24, 2018
Pretty much every pastoral culture that keeps cattle or goats drinks milk, including nomads, from Africa to Mongolia. They've been doing it for thousands of years
Doesnt mean its good for them does it? Some cultures have had more time to adjust to dairy than others.

"Rates of lactose intolerance vary between regions, from less than 10% in Northern Europe to as high as 95% in parts of Asia and Africa."
Hardly overpopulating their environment
How would you know that? Pastoralism is largely responsible for desertification in many regions. Southern drift of the sahel for instance.
Cont>
TheGhostofOtto1923
1 / 5 (2) Mar 24, 2018
Domesticating animals and growing crops was the first giant leap toward providing sufficient nutrition reliably
No, it indicates desperate attempts to feed pops by any means. Read malthus.

Ever read 'Guns Germs and Steel'? Diamond describes hunter gatherers as healthier, smarter, and more fit than any other people he encountered. And taller.
In case you forgot basic biology, humans are omnivores and have "evolved" to eat pretty much anything
Well sure including curley fries and big macs. What theyre eating today is making them fat and sick and stupid.
Cont>
antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (1) Mar 24, 2018
It requires lots of self-discipline in this age when food is almost free. But it works. And it works better than any other solution out there.

Sure it works - but how are you going to get people to use this in a culture geared towards immediate gratification? Especially where kids (who have even less self discipline than adults) are being targetted by corporations fielding whole armies of child psychologists to eliminate any kind of resistance to their foods as soon as possible?
TheGhostofOtto1923
1 / 5 (1) Mar 24, 2018
Grains and milk are just fine. So is meat and fat
You think I make this up all by myself?

"Modern hunter-gatherers and horticulturalists have lower blood pressure, greater insulin sensitivity and lower body mass index than North Americans. Moreover, obesity, type 2 diabetes, gout, hypertension and heart disease are very rare if not absent in traditional hunter-gatherers, horticulturalists and pastoralists, whereas youth in these societies are just now beginning to develop these conditions (Carrera-Bastos et al. 2011). In contrast, according to a recent report from the American Heart Association, 154.7 million adults in the United States are currently overweight or obese and the leading causes of mortality are heart disease and stroke (Go et al. 2013)."
Cont>
TheGhostofOtto1923
1 / 5 (1) Mar 24, 2018
"A majority (72.1%) of the total daily energy consumed in the typical Westernized diet is comprised of dairy products, cereals, refined sugars (sucrose, glucose and high fructose corn syrups), refined vegetable oils (salad and cooking oils, shortening, margarine) and alcohol. These foods would have comprised very little of the typical diet found in pre-agricultural societies (Cordain et al. 2005, Carrera-Bastos et al. 2011). Moreover, modern animal husbandry techniques have allowed farmers to prevent or slow down seasonal decreases in body fat, thereby elevating the levels of saturated fatty acids in meat as compared to what would have been consumed by pre-agricultural societies (Cordain et al. 2005)."

Etc.

-aksdad seems to be morbidly uninformed about a lot of things. Like for instance how overpopulation is the #1 problem the world faces today, as it has been ever since communal farming allowed a very few people to feed a lot more.
TheGhostofOtto1923
1 / 5 (2) Mar 24, 2018
BTW the hunter gatherer lifestyle/profession requires a lifelong education. I am not qualified.

Jared diamond asked one what would they do if one of their tribesmen ever ate a poison mushroom, which to him were indistinguishable from the edible variety.

"Only an idiot would do something that stupid!" They laughed.

Hey I'm about to walk into a Whole Foods - want me to pick you anything up? I think they have ring dings-
axemaster
5 / 5 (2) Mar 25, 2018
I may well be wrong, but in my opinion the US obesity epidemic is largely cultural in origin. Obese people in the US simply eat more. I know this for a fact because I eat at a cafeteria at MIT that charges by weight. You put your food on a scale and they weigh it - and you can see the weight on the front.

On average, I eat about 0.5 lbs every day for lunch.

On average, every fat person eats about 1.1 lbs for lunch.

So the cause is pretty clear. They are eating more than double what I eat! The only question for me is, how did this come to be?
ThomasQuinn
5 / 5 (1) Mar 25, 2018
You think I make this up all by myself?


Of course not. You prefer to cherry pick a couple of studies and facts that seem to back up your already established and immutable views and then hurl abuse at everyone who doesn't immediately convert to your position. It's your M.O., you've never done anything else and you never will.
TheGhostofOtto1923
not rated yet Mar 25, 2018
I forget Tommy - are you one of the religionist fantasy artists who like to post here and pretend they are saving the world from the sin of science?

If not, and you really do accept the fact that humans have descended (or ascended or whatever) from apes fairly recently then you must realize that we still retain many wild adaptions that apes acquired through eons of living and eating in certain environments.

And what they ate, and what their bodies were thus optimized to utilize, didn't include dairy products, cereals, refined sugars (sucrose, glucose and high fructose corn syrups), refined vegetable oils (salad and cooking oils, shortening, margarine) and alcohol.

Make sense?

So what makes you think that us domesticated apes suddenly became able to eat that crap and sit on our butts all day, and still remain healthy?
Cont>
MR166
not rated yet Mar 25, 2018
Axemaster look at the type of foods on their plates also. If they eat highly addictive foods by definition they have to eat more because they are addicted. One pound of salad even with a lot of olive oil is not the same as one pound of pasta or fries. BTW contrary to common knowledge it is not the oil that makes fries dangerous it is the carbs in the potatoes. Oils when eaten with high glycemic index carbs are the worst possible combination. The carbs are used for fuel and the oils are stored as fat.

As with all additions some people are able to limit their intake of addictive substances. That is why some can eat small amounts of breads and still stay in control. I know someone that only smoked 5 cigarettes a week while smokers smoke 20-40 a day.
TheGhostofOtto1923
not rated yet Mar 25, 2018
"Everything that lives and moves about will be food for you. Just as I gave you the green plants, I now give you everything." Gen9:3

-This implies of course that domestication was gods work and not man's, which we know isn't true.

Domestication was the result of ingenuity, of the need to produce more food than man could get from the natural environment.

It ALTERED natural food. When maximizing quantity, quality is usually lost. And most experts will tell you that domesticated foods do not provide near the nutrition or fiber that their natural precursors do.

This is all logic. We're able to examine the past and realize that as a result of chronic overgrowth, humans have lived in a very unnatural and unhealthy state for 10s of 1000s of years. And we arent adapting because those of us who can't adapt are nevertheless able to survive to reproduce whereas in the wild, they wouldn't.

A lot of the people who drowned in New Orleans during Katrina were simply too fat to swim.
TheGhostofOtto1923
not rated yet Mar 25, 2018
Sometimes natural selection is unavoidable.
ThomasQuinn
5 / 5 (1) Mar 25, 2018
I forget Tommy - are you one of the religionist fantasy artists who like to post here and pretend they are saving the world from the sin of science?


If you think I'm religious, that just goes to show how little attention you pay to anything but yourself. Apparently, you also disbelieve that it is even possible for the digestive system of a species to change in any way over a few thousand years, the development of lactose tolerance notwithstanding.

The trouble with you is that, even aside from the asinine personal attacks you are temperamentally incapable of refraining from, you are so full of yourself that you cannot conceive of things being in any way different from how you imagine they should be. You love to put down the religious nutjobs that come here, but you are so irony-impaired that you cannot see how your own preaching of Absolute Truth as Revealed to Otto has a nasty religious aftertaste. Anyway, you're the first ever to go on my ignore list. Bye bye!
MR166
not rated yet Mar 25, 2018
Otto perfection is the enemy of accomplishment. I for one do not want to live like and American Indian of the 16th century. If you want to use food scarcity as a means of population control then your hunter gatherer model is fine. The foods that we have available today in the US are more than adequate for fueling a long healthy life. That being said, the very least that we can do is provide the people with accurate and politically unbiased (PETA be dammed) information on the basis of a healthy diet.
TheGhostofOtto1923
1 / 5 (2) Mar 25, 2018
The trouble with you is that, even aside from the asinine personal attacks you are temperamentally incapable of refraining from, you are so full of yourself that you cannot conceive of things being in any way different from how you imagine they should be
Uh Tommy I'm not seeing anything from you but invective and ad hom attacks. You have any evidence to refute what I say then present it. Or STFU.
Otto perfection is the enemy of accomplishment. I for one do not want to live like and American Indian of the 16th century
I just had 3 glazed donuts for breakfast. But I got a nice kale salad with low fat dressing for later.

Kale - chewy and crunchy, good for the gums, helps to offset atrophy of the jawbone. I used to eat unshelled peanuts.
TheGhostofOtto1923
not rated yet Mar 25, 2018
If you want to use food scarcity as a means of population control then your hunter gatherer model is fine
What do you mean 'use'? A species will produce more offspring than can be expected to survive to maturity. This provides pressure to compel the occupation of new niches and diversification, speciation. But it also condemns a certain percentage to starvation.

Humans began systematically eliminating all those attritive elements that had served to keep our numbers in check. Overcrowding, starvation, disease, and conflict were the result.
The foods that we have available today in the US are more than adequate for fueling a long healthy life
You know you and the other posters can say these nice comforting things but it does not make them true. Evidence says that a large percentage of our population is sick, addiction prone, living with chronic pain, neurological and digestive problems, etc and that it is getting worse, not better.
MR166
not rated yet Mar 26, 2018
"Evidence says that a large percentage of our population is sick, addiction prone, living with chronic pain, neurological and digestive problems, etc and that it is getting worse, not better."

Yea most Americans have a crappy diet but you can't blame that on lack of healthful food.
TheGhostofOtto1923
not rated yet Mar 26, 2018
Yea most Americans have a crappy diet but you can't blame that on lack of healthful food
I just did. Domesticated foods are not healthful foods. They are not the foods we are adapted to eat.

"A majority (72.1%) of the total daily energy consumed in the typical Westernized diet is comprised of dairy products, cereals, refined sugars (sucrose, glucose and high fructose corn syrups), refined vegetable oils (salad and cooking oils, shortening, margarine) and alcohol. These foods would have comprised very little of the typical diet found in pre-agricultural societies (Cordain et al. 2005, Carrera-Bastos et al. 2011)."
https://onlinelib...ha.12303
TheGhostofOtto1923
not rated yet Mar 26, 2018
I for one do not want to live like and American Indian of the 16th century
Why not? First off the typical amerind from that period was primarily an agrarian whose foods were already domesticated.
https://en.wikipe..._cuisine

-so you really don't know what living like them or like an actual hunter gatherer means.

But our bodies crave exercise and a healthy diet. And most of us are unaware of how we would feel and of what life would be like, if we got these things as a matter of course, and if we had always lived that way.

My grandmother used to make the best dandelion salad, and she was only a few gens removed from her amerind roots. Dont know if the recipe was an old world adaptation but it included ingredients that were available to any tamarind.

Let us not forget that lettuce and celery are not really foods as they purportedly take more energy to digest than they provide.

Plus, I mean, just look at them.
TheGhostofOtto1923
not rated yet Mar 26, 2018
Tamarind = amerind, acvording to spellchuck. Notice it is even too stupid to correct acvording...
MR166
not rated yet Mar 26, 2018
Look Otto it is very easy to go out and buy fresh or frozen fruits and vegetables. They come from many countries and are available all year around. The same goes for meats. Yea is wild game better perhaps but it would soon be depleted if everyone hunted. That is why the Indians were nomads. They needed a fresh area to hunt. Yes they planted corn but did not remain local to tend it. The just returned when it was ready to harvest.
As far as prepared foods go no one is forcing people to eat pop tarts and twinkies. They can eat fresh food if they wish. It is fun to go out and pick wild fruit in season like raspberries and blueberries.
TheGhostofOtto1923
not rated yet Mar 27, 2018
Look Otto it is very easy to go out and buy fresh or frozen fruits and vegetables
Most have been altered from millenia of selection for quantity over quality. We didnt even know what the origin species of corn was until quite recently because it has been so altered.
They come from many countries and are available all year around
People throughout the pleistocene ate what was available locally and seasonally. What makes you think that eating domesticated foreign food all year round is good for you?
The same goes for meats. Yea is wild game better perhaps but it would soon be depleted if everyone hunted
Buffalo, venison, boar, rabbit, ostrich, etc are raised on game farms and available through chains like whole foods all over the place.

You don't know a whole lot about this subject do you?
That is why the Indians were nomads
Most indians were not nomads. They lived in villages and farmed their food.

What else don't you know? WHY are you guessing??
TheGhostofOtto1923
not rated yet Mar 27, 2018
For instance
Yes they planted corn but did not remain local to tend it. The just returned when it was ready to harvest
IOW they uprooted their entire villages for months and left their crops untended and at the mercy of mauraders and animals.

You have a source for this uh insight?

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