Health

Sleep and fitness go hand-in-hand

The University of Saskatchewan's (USask) Dr. Heather Foulds (PhD) and her team of students have conducted a new study which confirms the connection between sleep and physical activity among middle-aged women.

Diabetes

Levels of diabetes have tripled in 25 years

The proportion of adults with diagnosed diabetes trebled between 1994 and 2019, report researchers from UCL and the National Center for Social Research (NatCen), who have analyzed the latest results from the Health Survey ...

Cardiology

All weight loss isn't equal for reducing heart failure risk

Reducing the level of body fat and waist size are linked to a lower risk of heart failure in patients with type 2 diabetes, a study led by UT Southwestern researchers indicates. The findings, reported today in Circulation, ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Obesity a major risk factor for COVID-19 hospitalization

As patients with confirmed cases of COVID-19 first began arriving at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore in March, cardiologist David Kass heard surprising observations from his colleagues in the ICU. First, the patients ...

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Body mass index

The body mass index (BMI), or Quetelet index, is a controversial statistical measurement which compares a person's weight and height. Though it does not actually measure the percentage of body fat, it may be a useful tool to estimate a healthy body weight based on how tall a person is. Due to its ease of measurement and calculation, it is the most widely used diagnostic tool to identify weight problem within a population including: underweight, overweight and obesity. It was invented between 1830 and 1850 by the Belgian polymath Adolphe Quetelet during the course of developing "social physics". Body mass index is defined as the individual's body weight divided by the square of his or her height. The formulae universally used in medicine produce a unit of measure of kg/m2. BMI can also be determined using a BMI chart, which displays BMI as a function of weight (horizontal axis) and height (vertical axis) using contour lines for different values of BMI or colours for different BMI categories.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA