Macitentan cuts morbidity, death in pulmonary arterial HTN

August 29, 2013
Macitentan cuts morbidity, death in pulmonary arterial HTN
For patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension, the new dual endothelin-receptor antagonist macitentan is associated with reductions in morbidity and mortality, according to a study published in the Aug. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

(HealthDay)—For patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension, the new dual endothelin-receptor antagonist macitentan is associated with reductions in morbidity and mortality, according to a study published in the Aug. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Tomás Pulido, M.D., from the Ignacio Chávez National Heart Institute in Mexico City, and colleagues assessed the efficacy of macitentan for patients with symptomatic pulmonary arterial hypertension. Participants were randomized to receive placebo (250 patients), 3-mg macitentan once-daily (250 patients), and 10-mg macitentan once daily (242 patients). The primary end point was the time from treatment initiation to first occurrence of a composite of death, atrial septostomy, , initiation of treatment with intravenous or subcutaneous prostanoids, or pulmonary arterial hypertension worsening.

The researchers found that the primary end point occurred in 46.4, 38.0, and 31.4 percent of patients in the placebo, 3-mg, and 10-mg groups, respectively. Compared with placebo, the hazard ratios for the 3-mg and 10-mg macitentan doses were 0.70 and 055, respectively. The most frequent primary end point event was worsening of pulmonary arterial hypertension. The impact of macitentan on this end point was seen regardless of baseline pulmonary arterial hypertension therapy. Headache, nasopharyngitis, and anemia were the most frequent associated with macitentan.

"In conclusion, macitentan significantly reduced morbidity and mortality among patients with ," the authors write.

The study was funded by Actelion Pharmaceuticals, the manufacturer of macitentan.

Explore further: Heart rate recovery predicts clinical worsening in pulmonary hypertension

More information: Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Ambrisentan not effective in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

May 7, 2013

(HealthDay)—The endothelin A receptor-selective antagonist ambrisentan is not effective for reducing the rate of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) progression, according to a study published in the May 7 issue of the ...

Tofacitinib ups rheumatoid arthritis treatment response

August 22, 2013

(HealthDay)—The addition of tofacitinib to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treatment regimens improves patient response to non-biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), according to a study published in the Aug. ...

Recommended for you

Smoking leaves lasting marks on DNA, study finds

September 20, 2016

(HealthDay)—Smoking cigarettes can leave a lasting imprint on human DNA, altering more than 7,000 genes in ways that may contribute to the development of smoking-related diseases, a new study says.

Sleep disorders may influence heart disease risk factors

September 20, 2016

Sleep problems including sleeping too little or too long, may be linked to a variety of factors that may raise the risk for cardiovascular diseases, according to a new American Heart Association scientific statement published ...

Sleep troubles, heart troubles?

September 20, 2016

(HealthDay)—Sleep disorders—including too little or too much sleep—may contribute to heart disease risk factors, the American Heart Association said in its first statement on the risks of sleep problems.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.