New England Journal of Medicine

The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) is an English-language peer-reviewed medical journal published by the Massachusetts Medical Society. It describes itself as the oldest continuously published medical journal in the world. The journal publishes editorials, papers on original research, review articles, correspondence, and case reports, and has a special section called "Images in Clinical Medicine". In September 1811, John Collins Warren, a Boston physician, along with James Jackson, submitted a formal prospectus to establish the New England Journal of Medicine and Surgery and Collateral Branches of Science as a medical and philosophical journal. Subsequently, the first issue of the New England Journal of Medicine and Surgery and the Collateral Branches of Medical Science was published in January 1812. The journal was published quarterly. On April 29, 1823, another publication, the Boston Medical Intelligencer, appeared under the stewardship of Jerome V.C. Smith. The Intelligencer ran into financial troubles in the spring of 1827, and the editors of the New England Journal of Medicine and Surgery and the Collateral Branches of Medical Science purchased it in February 1828

Publisher
Massachusetts Medical Society
Country
United States
History
The New England Journal of Medicine and Surgery (1812–1826);
The New England Medical Review and Journal (1827);
The Boston Medical and Surgical Journal (1828–1927);
The New England Journal of Medicine (1928–present)
Impact factor
53.484 (2010)

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Psychology & Psychiatry

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For young patients, therapy works best when they are encouraged to become co-experts in the search for answers, according to a Perspectives article published by the New England Journal of Medicine co-authored by Dominique ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Lifetime suicide risk factors identified

A review of studies into suicide risk factors at different stages of peoples' lives, as well as of the effectiveness of assessment and treatment approaches, has found that while some factors such as genetics and family history ...

Pediatrics

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(HealthDay)—For extremely preterm infants, high-dose erythropoietin treatment from 24 hours after birth does not result in a reduced risk for severe neurodevelopmental impairment or death at age 2 years, according to a ...

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Care management for complex needs may not cut readmissions

(HealthDay)—Among patients with very high use of health care services, readmission rates were not lower for those assigned to a care-transition program compared with usual care, according to a study published in the Jan. ...

Health

In health care, does 'hotspotting' make patients better?

The new health care practice of "hotspotting"—in which providers identify very high-cost patients and attempt to reduce their medical spending while improving care—has virtually no impact on patient outcomes, according ...

Health

Intermittent fasting: live 'fast,' live longer?

For many people, the New Year is a time to adopt new habits as a renewed commitment to personal health. Newly enthusiastic fitness buffs pack into gyms and grocery stores are filled with shoppers eager to try out new diets.

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