Celecoxib may prevent lung cancer in former smokers

July 6, 2011, American Association for Cancer Research

Celecoxib may emerge as a potent chemopreventive agent for lung cancer, according to a recent study in Cancer Prevention Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Researchers tested celecoxib, a , among patients who were former smokers and found a significant benefit in bronchial health as measured by the Ki-67 labeling index, a marker of or growth, as well as a number of other . The findings follow a previous report published in Cancer Prevention Research that showed a similar effect on Ki-67 among former smokers and current smokers (Kim et al., Feb. 2010).

"Taken together, these findings strongly suggest that celecoxib can be used as a chemopreventive agent in these high-risk groups," said Jenny Mao, M.D., a professor of medicine at the University of New Mexico and section chief of pulmonary and at the New Mexico VA Health System.

Mao cautioned, however, that both the current study, where she was the lead researcher, and the Feb. 2010 study were phase II trials, and that large phase III trials are still needed to confirm the findings.

J. Jack Lee, Ph.D., a professor of biostatistics at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center and the statistical editor of , estimates that there are currently 45 million former smokers and 45 million current smokers in the United States alone.

"The oncology community does not have a good treatment for . Unless it is caught in the earliest stages, the five-year survival is only about 15 percent," said Lee. "The best way is to intercept at the earliest stages and try to reverse the processes that can lead to cancer. These studies suggest celecoxib may be a tool to do that."

For the current study, Mao and colleagues enrolled 137 patients and randomly assigned them to 400 mg celecoxib twice daily or a placebo. Patients had to be at least 45 years old, and had to have stopped smoking for at least a year.

Researchers conducted bronchoscopies at baseline and six months to measure changes in the Ki-67 labeling index. Treatment with celecoxib reduced this index by 34 percent compared to a 3.8 percent increase with the placebo group. Decreases in this index were also linked with a reduction in lung nodules, a potential precursor to cancer.

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Single blood test screens for eight cancer types

January 18, 2018
Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers developed a single blood test that screens for eight common cancer types and helps identify the location of the cancer.

Researchers find a way to 'starve' cancer

January 18, 2018
Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) have demonstrated for the first time that it is possible to starve a tumor and stop its growth with a newly discovered small compound that blocks uptake of the vital ...

How cancer metastasis happens: Researchers reveal a key mechanism

January 18, 2018
Cancer metastasis, the migration of cells from a primary tumor to form distant tumors in the body, can be triggered by a chronic leakage of DNA within tumor cells, according to a team led by Weill Cornell Medicine and Memorial ...

Modular gene enhancer promotes leukemia and regulates effectiveness of chemotherapy

January 18, 2018
Every day, billions of new blood cells are generated in the bone marrow. The gene Myc is known to play an important role in this process, and is also known to play a role in cancer. Scientists from the German Cancer Research ...

These foods may up your odds for colon cancer

January 18, 2018
(HealthDay)—Chowing down on red meat, white bread and sugar-laden drinks might increase your long-term risk of colon cancer, a new study suggests.

The pill lowers ovarian cancer risk, even for smokers

January 18, 2018
(HealthDay)—It's known that use of the birth control pill is tied to lower odds for ovarian cancer, but new research shows the benefit extends to smokers or women who are obese.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.