Bortezomib beneficial in graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis

August 8, 2012
Bortezomib beneficial in graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis
Patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing an HLA-mismatched unrelated donor reduced-intensity conditioning hematopoietic stem cell transplantation may benefit from a prophylactic, short-course, bortezomib-based regimen to reduce the incidence of graft-versus-host disease, according to research published online Aug. 6 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

(HealthDay) -- Patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing an HLA-mismatched unrelated donor (MMUD) reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) may benefit from a prophylactic, short-course, bortezomib-based regimen to reduce the incidence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), according to research published online Aug. 6 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

John Koreth, M.B.B.S., D.Phil., of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, and colleagues conducted a prospective, phase I/II trial involving 45 patients who underwent MMUD RIC HSCT. Participants underwent a short-course GVHD prophylaxis regimen consisting of bortezomib administered on days one, four, and seven following peripheral stem cell infusion plus methotrexate and tacrolimus.

The researchers found that the cumulative incidence of grade 2 to 4 GVHD over 180 days was 22 percent and the one-year cumulative incidence was 29 percent for chronic GVHD. At two years, deaths due to relapse occurred in 38 percent, and nonrelapse mortality was 11 percent. Progression-free survival and overall survival were 51 and 64 percent, respectively, at two years. The rates of nonrelapse mortality, acute and chronic GVHD, and survival were similar to those of contemporaneous HLA-matched RIC HSCT.

"In conclusion, short-course, bortezomib-based GVHD prophylaxis appears safe and efficacious in HLA-mismatched RIC transplantation, with encouraging survival," the authors write. "Importantly, bortezomib-based MMUD transplantation achieved clinical outcomes comparable to HLA-matched transplantation, along with enhancement of various immune reconstitution parameters."

One author disclosed financial ties to Millennium Pharmaceuticals, which partially funded the study and develops and markets .

Explore further: Researchers test drug combinations to prevent graft vs. host disease

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Related Stories

Researchers test drug combinations to prevent graft vs. host disease

June 26, 2012
Researchers at Moffitt Cancer Center have conducted a clinical trial aimed at preventing graft vs. host disease (GVHD) in patients who have received hematopoietic (blood) cell transplants (HCT). The study, comparing the drug ...

HIV drug reduces graft-versus-host disease in stem cell transplant patients

December 13, 2011
An HIV drug that redirects immune cell traffic appears to significantly reduce the dangerous complication graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) in blood cancer patients following allogeneic stem cell transplantation (ASCT), according ...

Mini-molecule governs severity of acute graft vs. host disease, study finds

March 12, 2012
Researchers have identified a molecule that helps control the severity of graft-versus-host disease, a life-threatening complication for many leukemia patients who receive a bone-marrow transplant.

Antibodies from rabbits improve survival and relapse outcomes of leukemia and myelodysplasia

July 6, 2012
Researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) Massey Cancer Center's Bone Marrow Transplant Program have demonstrated that the use of antibodies derived from rabbits can improve the survival and relapse outcomes of ...

HIV drug reduces graft-vs.-host disease in bone marrow transplant patients

July 11, 2012
An HIV drug that redirects immune cell traffic significantly reduces the incidence of a dangerous complication that often follows bone marrow transplants for blood cancer patients, according to research from the Perelman ...

Recommended for you

How cancer metastasis happens: Researchers reveal a key mechanism

January 18, 2018
Cancer metastasis, the migration of cells from a primary tumor to form distant tumors in the body, can be triggered by a chronic leakage of DNA within tumor cells, according to a team led by Weill Cornell Medicine and Memorial ...

Modular gene enhancer promotes leukemia and regulates effectiveness of chemotherapy

January 18, 2018
Every day, billions of new blood cells are generated in the bone marrow. The gene Myc is known to play an important role in this process, and is also known to play a role in cancer. Scientists from the German Cancer Research ...

These foods may up your odds for colon cancer

January 18, 2018
(HealthDay)—Chowing down on red meat, white bread and sugar-laden drinks might increase your long-term risk of colon cancer, a new study suggests.

The pill lowers ovarian cancer risk, even for smokers

January 18, 2018
(HealthDay)—It's known that use of the birth control pill is tied to lower odds for ovarian cancer, but new research shows the benefit extends to smokers or women who are obese.

Researchers develop swallowable test to detect pre-cancerous Barrett's esophagus

January 17, 2018
Investigators at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center have developed a simple, swallowable test for early detection of Barrett's esophagus that offers promise ...

Scientists zoom in to watch DNA code being read

January 17, 2018
Scientists have unveiled incredible images of how the DNA code is read and interpreted—revealing new detail about one of the fundamental processes of life.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.