Safety, efficacy of at-home laser for periobital wrinkles studied

October 24, 2012
Safety, efficacy of at-home laser for periobital wrinkles studied
A handheld nonablative fractional laser is safe and seems effective for home use for treating periorbital wrinkles, according to a study published in the November issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

(HealthDay)—A handheld nonablative fractional laser is safe and seems effective for home use for treating periorbital wrinkles, according to a study published in the November issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

James Leyden, M.D., from the Skin Study Center in Broomall, Penn., and colleagues conducted a multicenter trial consisting of two clinical studies in which 124 subjects performed at-home treatment of periorbital wrinkles using a handheld nonablative fractional . Both studies comprised an active treatment phase, including daily treatments, and twice-weekly treatments in a maintenance phase. Ninety subjects were followed through completion of the maintenance phase and 36 were followed for five months after its completion. An in-person investigator assessment, independent blinded review, and subject self-assessment were used to evaluate treatment.

The researchers found that patients were able to follow instructions for safely using the laser, with good compliance to the protocol, and treatments were well tolerated. Independent blinded evaluations showed an improvement in the Fitzpatrick Wrinkle Scale score by one or more grades in 90 percent of subjects at the end of the active phase and in 79 percent at the end of the maintenance phase. Transient posttreatment erythema was the most prevalent side effect.

"In sum, the test device and at-home was demonstrated to have a favorable safety profile and to be effective at reducing the appearance of periorbital ," the authors write. "Subject compliance was high, treatments were well tolerated, and side effects were minimal and transient."

Two authors disclosed financial ties to Palomar Medical Technologies, which funded the study and manufactures the device used in the study.

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