Safety, efficacy of at-home laser for periobital wrinkles studied

October 24, 2012
Safety, efficacy of at-home laser for periobital wrinkles studied
A handheld nonablative fractional laser is safe and seems effective for home use for treating periorbital wrinkles, according to a study published in the November issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

(HealthDay)—A handheld nonablative fractional laser is safe and seems effective for home use for treating periorbital wrinkles, according to a study published in the November issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

James Leyden, M.D., from the Skin Study Center in Broomall, Penn., and colleagues conducted a multicenter trial consisting of two clinical studies in which 124 subjects performed at-home treatment of periorbital wrinkles using a handheld nonablative fractional . Both studies comprised an active treatment phase, including daily treatments, and twice-weekly treatments in a maintenance phase. Ninety subjects were followed through completion of the maintenance phase and 36 were followed for five months after its completion. An in-person investigator assessment, independent blinded review, and subject self-assessment were used to evaluate treatment.

The researchers found that patients were able to follow instructions for safely using the laser, with good compliance to the protocol, and treatments were well tolerated. Independent blinded evaluations showed an improvement in the Fitzpatrick Wrinkle Scale score by one or more grades in 90 percent of subjects at the end of the active phase and in 79 percent at the end of the maintenance phase. Transient posttreatment erythema was the most prevalent side effect.

"In sum, the test device and at-home was demonstrated to have a favorable safety profile and to be effective at reducing the appearance of periorbital ," the authors write. "Subject compliance was high, treatments were well tolerated, and side effects were minimal and transient."

Two authors disclosed financial ties to Palomar Medical Technologies, which funded the study and manufactures the device used in the study.

Explore further: At-home diode laser effective for permanent hair reduction

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

At-home diode laser effective for permanent hair reduction

August 22, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Eight treatments with a home-use diode laser provide effective and safe permanent hair reduction one year after the last treatment, according to research published in the September issue of Lasers in Surgery ...

Pulsed dye laser effective on port-wine stains in infants

February 28, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Pulsed dye laser (PDL) treatment at two-, three-, and four-week intervals is effective for infants with facial port-wine stains (PWS), with minimal short-term side effects, according to a study published online ...

Dual mode laser therapy effectively treats acne vulgaris

March 27, 2012
(HealthDay) -- A series of Nd:YAG laser treatments effectively and rapidly reduces both inflammatory and noninflammatory acne vulgaris lesions, according to a study published in the April issue of the Journal of the American ...

Recommended for you

CAR-T immunotherapy may help blood cancer patients who don't respond to standard treatments

October 20, 2017
Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis is one of the first centers nationwide to offer a new immunotherapy that targets certain blood cancers. Newly approved ...

Researchers pinpoint causes for spike in breast cancer genetic testing

October 20, 2017
A sharp rise in the number of women seeking BRCA genetic testing to evaluate their risk of developing breast cancer was driven by multiple factors, including celebrity endorsement, according to researchers at the University ...

Study shows how nerves drive prostate cancer

October 19, 2017
In a study in today's issue of Science, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, part of Montefiore Medicine, report that certain nerves sustain prostate cancer growth by triggering a switch that causes tumor vessels ...

Gene circuit switches on inside cancer cells, triggers immune attack

October 19, 2017
Researchers at MIT have developed a synthetic gene circuit that triggers the body's immune system to attack cancers when it detects signs of the disease.

One to 10 mutations are needed to drive cancer, scientists find

October 19, 2017
For the first time, scientists have provided unbiased estimates of the number of mutations needed for cancers to develop, in a study of more than 7,500 tumours across 29 cancer types. Researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger ...

Researchers target undruggable cancers

October 19, 2017
A new approach to targeting key cancer-linked proteins, thought to be 'undruggable," has been discovered through an alliance between industry and academia.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.