Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

Laser + bipolar resection helpful for large prostates

(HealthDay)—Bipolar transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) in combination with high-intensity diode laser (DL + b-TURP) is feasible for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in large prostates, according ...

Oct 26, 2012
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Testosterone testing has increased in recent years

(HealthDay)—There has been a recent increase in the rate of testosterone testing, with more testing seen in men with comorbidities associated with hypogonadism, according to research published online Nov. 10 in the Journal ...

Nov 21, 2014
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Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) also known as benign prostatic hypertrophy (technically a misnomer), benign enlargement of the prostate (BEP), and adenofibromyomatous hyperplasia, refers to the increase in size of the prostate.

Properly, BPH involves hyperplasia rather than hypertrophy, but the nomenclature is often interchangeable, even amongst urologists. It involves hyperplasia of prostatic stromal and epithelial cells, resulting in the formation of large, fairly discrete nodules in the periurethral region of the prostate. When sufficiently large, the nodules compress the urethral canal to cause partial, or sometimes virtually complete, obstruction of the urethra, which interferes with the normal flow of urine. It leads to symptoms of urinary hesitancy, frequent urination, dysuria (painful urination), increased risk of urinary tract infections, and urinary retention. Although prostate specific antigen levels may be elevated in these patients because of increased organ volume and inflammation due to urinary tract infections, BPH is not considered to be a premalignant lesion.

Adenomatous prostatic growth is believed to begin at approximately age 30 years. An estimated 50% of men have histologic evidence of BPH by age 50 years and 75% by age 80 years. In 40-50% of these patients, BPH becomes clinically significant.

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