Congenital Heart Defect

Bio-inspired glue keeps hearts securely sealed

When a child is born with a heart defect such as a hole in the heart, the highly invasive therapies are challenging due to an inability to quickly and safely secure devices inside the heart. Sutures take ...

Jan 08, 2014
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Congenital heart defects affects long-term development

Approximately one percent of all newborns in Switzerland are diagnosed with a congenital heart defect, roughly half of them require open heart surgery. Most children, including those with the most severe heart defects, survive ...

Dec 02, 2013
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Environmental toxins linked to heart defects

Children's congenital heart defects may be associated with their mothers' exposure to specific mixtures of environmental toxins during pregnancy, according to research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific ...

Nov 17, 2013
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Family history doubles aortic stenosis risk

The risk of aortic stenosis doubles when a first degree relative had the disease, according to research presented at ESC Congress 2013 today by Dr. Mattis F. Ranthe from Denmark. The study of 4.2 million people from Danish ...

Sep 01, 2013
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Landmark study on origins of congenital heart disease

(Medical Xpress)—In a first-of-its-kind study published in the journal Nature, scientists identified a group of gene mutations that may be behind up to 10 percent of complex congenital heart defects, the mo ...

Jul 24, 2013
popularity 5 / 5 (2) | comments 0 | with audio podcast

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