Gum Disease

Researchers reverse bone loss in immune disorder

Patients with leukocyte adhesion deficiency, or LAD, suffer from frequent bacterial infections, including the severe gum disease known as periodontitis. These patients often lose their teeth early in life.

Mar 26, 2014
popularity 4.7 / 5 (3) | comments 0

Gum disease bacteria may cause heart disease

A University of Florida study shows that the same bacteria that cause gum disease also promotes heart disease – a discovery that could change the way heart disease is diagnosed and treated. Researchers report their findings ...

May 18, 2014
popularity 4.8 / 5 (4) | comments 1

Protein plays key role in infection by oral pathogen

Scientists at Forsyth, along with a colleague from Northwestern University, have discovered that the protein, Transgultaminase 2 (TG2), is a key component in the process of gum disease. TG2 is widely distributed inside and ...

Mar 24, 2014
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Antibacterial agent boosts toothpaste effectiveness

Regular use of fluoride toothpaste containing triclosan, an antibacterial agent, and a copolymer, which helps prevent the triclosan from being washed away by saliva, reduces plaque, gingivitis, and bleeding ...

Jan 10, 2014
popularity 4.5 / 5 (2) | comments 0 | with audio podcast

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