Hay Fever

Surviving hay fever

Three million Australian adults – 15% of the population – struggle through spring and summer with watery eyes, running nose, itchy throat and the hallmark hay fever symptom, sneezing. ...

Nov 17, 2014
popularity not rated yet | comments 0

Moisturising newborns prevents allergies: Japan study

Applying moisturiser to a newborn baby's skin could help prevent eczema and even food allergies in later life, possibly offering a cheap and easy way to combat a growing global problem, a Japanese institute said Friday.

Oct 03, 2014
popularity not rated yet | comments 0

New allergy tablets offer alternative to shots

For decades, seasonal allergy sufferers had two therapy options to ease the misery of hay fever. They could swallow pills or squirt nasal sprays every day for brief reprieves from the sneezing and itchy eyes. ...

Jun 02, 2014
popularity 5 / 5 (1) | comments 0

Merck: New drugs pending approval or in late tests

Merck & Co. could get an impressive six new prescription medicines approved in the U.S. this year and will soon apply for regulatory approval of two others, company executives said Tuesday during a briefing on Merck's business.

May 06, 2014
popularity 5 / 5 (1) | comments 0

So long snow, hello pollen

(HealthDay)—Although it still feels like winter in many parts of the United States, it's time to prepare for spring allergies, an expert says.

Apr 06, 2014
popularity 5 / 5 (1) | comments 0

Spring is here, but so are allergies

Spring has finally arrived in Cincinnati, but soon to follow will be the coughing, sneezing and wheezing that comes with allergies, hay fever and asthma—three warm weather killjoys most could do without.

Mar 21, 2014
popularity not rated yet | comments 0

Allergic rhinitis is an allergic inflammation of the nasal airways. It occurs when an allergen, such as pollen, dust or animal dander (particles of shed skin and hair) is inhaled by an individual with a sensitized immune system. In such individuals, the allergen triggers the production of the antibody immunoglobulin E (IgE), which binds to mast cells and basophils containing histamine. When caused by pollens of any plants, it is called "pollinosis", and if specifically caused by grass pollens, it is known as "hay fever". Ironically, in hay fever, there is neither any fever nor any hay, but since grasses shed their pollens into the air, at about the same time that hay is being cut, the common term hay fever is used.

IgE bound to mast cells are stimulated by pollen and dust, causing the release of inflammatory mediators such as histamine (and other chemicals). This usually causes sneezing, itchy and watery eyes, swelling and inflammation of the nasal passages, and an increase in mucus production. Symptoms vary in severity between individuals. Very sensitive individuals can experience hives or other rashes. Particulate matter in polluted air, and chemicals such as chlorine and detergents, which can normally be tolerated, can greatly aggravate allergic rhinitis. The physician John Bostock first described hay fever in 1819 as a disease.

Allergies are common. Heredity and environmental exposures may contribute to a predisposition to allergies. It is roughly estimated that one in three people have an active allergy at any given time and at least three in four people develop an allergic reaction at least once in their lives. In Western countries between 10–25% of people annually are affected by allergic rhinitis.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

Latest Spotlight News

She's not interested in sex but he thinks she is

Imagine the following scenario: a woman and a man are having a conversation. She is interested in the conversation, and is friendly, smiling and warm. He interprets her behavior as sexual interest.

Scientists find Ebola virus is mutating

(Medical Xpress)—Researchers working at Institut Pasteur in France have found that the Ebola virus is mutating "a lot" causing concern in the African countries where the virus has killed over eight thous ...

A challenge to expedite Genervon's new ASL drug

(Medical Xpress)—The Ice Bucket Challenge to raise awareness for Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) went viral on social media last summer. Over 1.2 million videos were posted on Facebook alone. The difficulty ...