Heart Failure

3-D heart sock could replace pacemaker

(Medical Xpress)—An international research team that includes a University of Alberta engineering professor has designed a 3-D silicone "heart sock" that could eventually replace the venerable pacemaker.

Mar 26, 2014
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Injected gel might someday help treat heart failure

(HealthDay)—Attempting to reduce the risk for heart failure following a heart attack, early research on swine takes a new protective approach: targeted injection of naturally occurring "protein inhibitors" ...

Feb 13, 2014
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Brain biomarker shows promise in heart

A biomarker widely used to diagnose brain injury has shown early promise for assessing the severity of heart inflammation, or myocarditis, find researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public ...

Jan 27, 2014
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Immune cells may heal an injured heart

The immune system plays an important role in the heart's response to injury. But until recently, confusing data made it difficult to distinguish the immune factors that encourage the heart to heal following ...

Jan 16, 2014
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Heart failure (HF) often called congestive heart failure (CHF) is generally defined as the inability of the heart to supply sufficient blood flow to meet the needs of the body. Heart failure can cause a number of symptoms including shortness of breath, leg swelling, and exercise intolerance. The condition is diagnosed with echocardiography and blood tests. Treatment commonly consists of lifestyle measures (such as smoking cessation, light exercise including breathing protocols, decreased salt intake and other dietary changes) and medications, and sometimes devices or even surgery.

Common causes of heart failure include myocardial infarction and other forms of ischemic heart disease, hypertension, valvular heart disease, and cardiomyopathy. The term "heart failure" is sometimes incorrectly used to describe other cardiac-related illnesses, such as myocardial infarction (heart attack) or cardiac arrest, which can cause heart failure but are not equivalent to heart failure.

Heart failure is a common, costly, disabling, and potentially deadly condition. In developed countries, around 2% of adults suffer from heart failure, but in those over the age of 65, this increases to 6–10%.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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