Researchers urge routine screening for child abuse

(HealthDay)—The early signs of child abuse among infants and toddlers—head trauma, rib fractures, or abdominal injuries—are often missed, and that may be due in part to a lack of standardized screening, researchers ...

Oct 06, 2015
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As 'abortion pill' turns 15, debate rages on

Fifteen years after its approval in the United States, the drug mifepristone is used in nearly a quarter of all abortions, a proportion that has grown steadily even as the national abortion rate has fallen to a historic low.

Sep 22, 2015
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Bleeding, technically known as hemorrhaging or haemorrhaging (see American and British spelling differences), is the loss of blood or blood escape from the circulatory system. Bleeding can occur internally, where blood leaks from blood vessels inside the body, or externally, either through a natural opening such as the vagina, mouth, nose, ear or anus, or through a break in the skin. Desanguination is a massive blood loss, and the complete loss of blood is referred to as exsanguination. Typically, a healthy person can endure a loss of 10–15% of the total blood volume without serious medical difficulties, and blood donation typically takes 8–10% of the donor's blood volume.

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