Hemorrhage

Knowing the signs of stroke can save lives

Almost 795,000 Americans suffer from stroke each year, 130,000 which are fatal, making stroke the fifth leading cause of death in the United States. But how many Americans would be able to recognize the signs and symptoms ...

May 13, 2016
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Nilotinib associated with case of scurvy

(HealthDay)—Nilotinib is associated with scurvy, possibly because of its effects on cutaneous metabolism, according to a letter to the editor published online April 28 in the Journal of Cutaneous Pathology.

May 11, 2016
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Bleeding, technically known as hemorrhaging or haemorrhaging (see American and British spelling differences), is the loss of blood or blood escape from the circulatory system. Bleeding can occur internally, where blood leaks from blood vessels inside the body, or externally, either through a natural opening such as the vagina, mouth, nose, ear or anus, or through a break in the skin. Desanguination is a massive blood loss, and the complete loss of blood is referred to as exsanguination. Typically, a healthy person can endure a loss of 10–15% of the total blood volume without serious medical difficulties, and blood donation typically takes 8–10% of the donor's blood volume.

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