Kidney Disease

Treatment for lupus enters phase III

Lupuzor may become the first specific and non-immunosuppressant therapy for lupus, a disabling autoimmune disease that is currently incurable. Discovered by Sylviane Muller's team in the CNRS Immunopathologie et Chimie Thérapeutique ...

Dec 15, 2015
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Positive sign in America's diabetes fight

Is there light at the end of the "diabesity" tunnel? New data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention seem to confirm that recent reports showing the U.S. diabetes epidemic beginning to decline are not a statistical ...

Dec 04, 2015
popularity6 comments 1

The case for testing drugs on pregnant women

When the heart stops beating, minutes matter. With every minute that passes before a rhythm is restored, a patient's odds of survival plummet. Which is why Anne Lyerly was surprised when, one night 20 years ago, she got a ...

Nov 24, 2015
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The transformation of cancer imaging

Taken by Wilhelm Roentgen in 1895, the first X-ray produced was of his wife's hand. Roentgen received the first Nobel Prize in physics for his work, but his discovery of X-ray beams also changed the medical profession far ...

Dec 17, 2015
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Safer, faster heart scans in view

A team of Oxford University researchers has developed a technique that could improve heart scans for patients, giving more information about the heart than traditional scans and without any injections, making them safer and ...

Dec 10, 2015
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Nephropathy refers to damage to or disease of the kidney. An older term for this is nephrosis.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

Latest Spotlight News

Common gene variant influences food choices

If you're fat, can you blame it on your genes? The answer is a qualified yes. Maybe. Under certain circumstances. Researchers are moving towards a better understanding of some of the roots of obesity.

Study finds possible new jet-lag treatment

Exposing people to short flashes of light while they're sleeping could provide a fast and efficient method of preventing jet lag, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.